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This code works:

ISOdatetime(2011,4,7,12,0,0, tz = "EST")

This code does not:

ISOdatetime(2011,4,7,12,0,0, tz = "CST")

I want the central time zone, with no adjustment for daylight savings. What am I doing wrong? Where can I find a table of timezones recognized by R?

edit: Thanks for the info Josh, but ISOdatetime(2011,3,13,2,0,0, tz = "America/Chicago") yields NA, and is unfortunately a value in my dataset. Any ideas how to deal with this? It seems like my dataset is on Chicago time, but does not observe daylight savings time.

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Is the timezone necessary for your purposes, or could you just ignore it and use GMT? –  Joshua Ulrich Apr 7 '11 at 19:55
    
@Joshua Ulrich: For now I will just ignore it and use GMT. Unfortunately, I have data from several timezone in this manner, and was hoping to make use of R's easy-to-use time zone conversion functions. If I want to add (or subtract) one hour from a GMT time, what's the best way to do that? –  Zach Apr 7 '11 at 20:00
    
I would do it how I did it in my answer. Though I find it curious that your data has timestamps that don't follow the DST conventions of the timezone. Do your raw data have an explicit timezone (e.g. "2011-03-13 02:00:00 CST"), or could they be GMT already? –  Joshua Ulrich Apr 7 '11 at 20:06
    
@Joshua Ulrich: The raw data does not have an explicit timezone, but it is not GMT. As far as I can tell, it's GMT-6 exactly. I'll just add 6 hours and treat it as GMT. Thank you for the advice! –  Zach Apr 7 '11 at 22:48
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1 Answer

up vote 1 down vote accepted

See ?timezone and the file, R_HOME/share/zoneinfo/zone.tab.

There's no such thing as "the central time zone, with no adjustment for daylight savings". The US central time zone has DST rules and they have changed over the years. You could always read in your dates as GMT, add 6 hours, then convert to CST6CDT.

> .POSIXct(ISOdatetime(2011,3,13,2,0,0, tz="GMT")+3600*6, tz="CST6CDT")
[1] "2011-03-13 03:00:00 CDT"
> .POSIXct(ISOdatetime(2011,3,13,2,0,0, tz="GMT")+3600*6, tz="America/Chicago")
[1] "2011-03-13 03:00:00 CDT"
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Nice, a down-vote because I haven't responded to the OP's edit yet... –  Joshua Ulrich Apr 7 '11 at 18:51
    
Thanks for the link. Is there any way I can specify "Chicago time with no daylight savings time?" ISOdatetime(2011,3,13,2,0,0, tz = "America/Chicago") yields NA, and is unfortunately a value in my dataset. –  Zach Apr 7 '11 at 18:52
    
Nice, a down-vote because I haven't responded to the OP's edit yet... -- I think we got there at just about the same time. –  Zach Apr 7 '11 at 18:53
1  
Wow, I don't think I've ever seen a worst documentation page for an R function. –  Benjamin Apr 7 '11 at 18:59
    
@Benjamin, as it says in ?timezone, EST is not US eastern time, it "is a time zone used in Canada without daylight savings time". It's also defined in R_HOME/share/zoneinfo/EST. Note there's no corresponding CST file. And if you find the documentation bad, you're more than welcome to submit an improvement to R-core. ;-) –  Joshua Ulrich Apr 7 '11 at 19:00
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