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My partner and I are building a web app and I'm looking for suggestions on a git workflow that we can implement. I'm the developer half of this team so I want to keep all of the difficult version control (i.e. merging and pushing to production) under my control but I want my partner - the designer - to be able to start to use git and start to learn some of it's goodness. I don't want a workflow that would be appropriate for a team of developers because I want to handhold my partner through this to get him going with git. What I'm thinking is something like this:

  1. Designer clones git from my local machine:

    designer:~/$git clone git://192.168.0.1/programmer/project.git

  2. Designer branches and makes changes:

    designer:~/$git co -b designer-branch

  3. Designer pushes his branch to my machine:

    designer:~/$git push designer-branch

  4. I'll merge the designer-branch into the master:

    programmer:~/$git co master programmer:~/$git merge designer-branch

  5. I push the changes to our repo:

    programmer:~/$git push

I think this makes the most sense but I'd love any tips or tricks that other developers have when you've tried to bring a designer into the git fold.

Thanks!

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1 Answer

up vote 2 down vote accepted

The only thing I would add is to use feature branches and stay away from trunk-based development. If you are resolving conflicts, share how you resolved them with rerere:

http://progit.org/2010/03/08/rerere.html

The rr-cache directory contents can be shared via symlinks to a "helper" repo. This way others can put features together and not require the assistance of the person who originally solved a conflict.

Google "git flow" as well. It automates some of the redundant things you do with branches.

Hope this helps.

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Thanks for the tips. I really like git-flow. It looks like it will be a great tool when I add more developers to our team. For right now, I'm going to stay away from it because I don't want to scare my designer ... to much :) –  spinlock Apr 7 '11 at 20:27
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