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It's been a long time since I had to deal with concurrent programming in Java (it was in concurrent programming college classes, actually) and I'm having what to seem some pretty basic problem. The sample code below might seem kinda weird since I'm not using standard JDK for UI controls, but it goes like this:

//class Screen
public class Screen{
    private Frame rootContainer;

    public Screen(Frame rootContainer){
        this.rootContainer = rootContainer;
        this.createGui();
    }

    private void createGui(){
        Button btn = new Button("Call");
        btn.setBounds(20, 20, 100, 20);
        rootContainer.add(btn);
        btn.addActionListener(new ActionListener() {

            public void actionPerformed(ActionEvent e) {
                ConcurrentDialog cr = createDialog();
                cr.start();
                //Suposedly only to be called after the Exit button in the dialog is clicked
                ((Button)e.getSource()).setLabel("Called");
                ((Button)e.getSource()).repaint();
            }
        });
    }

    private ConcurrentDialog createDialog(){
        return new ConcurrentDialog(rootContainer, this);
    }
}

//Class ConcurrentDialog
public class ConcurrentDialog extends Thread {
    private Frame rootContainer;
    private Screen screen;

    public ConcurrentDialog(Frame rootContainer, Screen screen){
        this.rootContainer = rootContainer;
        this.screen = screen;
    }

    public void run(){
        createDialog();
        synchronized(screen){
            try {
                screen.wait();
            } catch (InterruptedException e1) {
                e1.printStackTrace();
            }
        }
    }

    private void createDialog(){
        Dialog dialog = new Dialog(rootContainer, true);
        dialog.setBounds(20, 20, 110, 35);
        Button btn = new Button("Exit");
        btn.setBounds(5, 5, 100, 20);

        btn.addActionListener(new ActionListener() {

            public void actionPerformed(ActionEvent e) {
                Button source = (Button)e.getSource();
                Dialog dialog = (Dialog)source.getParent();

                synchronized(screen){
                    screen.notify();
                }

                dialog.dispose();
                dialog.getOwner().remove(dialog);
                dialog = null;
            }
        });

        dialog.add(btn);
        dialog.show();
    }
}

Before anyone asks, yes, I'm trying to implement a modal dialog (in fact, I should rename ConcurrentDialog to ModalDialog). As I said before, I'm not using swing (just because I CAN'T... Embeded VM's are usually platform-specific when it comes to UI and that's my case) and this particular library doesn't have a native Modal Dialog (meaning no JOptionPane.showMessageDialog love for me) so I'm building one from scratch.

Anyway, here's the problem: It seems that the wait() method is executed much later than ((Button)e.getSource()).setLabel("Called"). A workaround that I found is setting btn as a global attribute with public access and refactor the run() method to this:

public void run(){
    createDialog();
    synchronized(screen){
        try {
            screen.wait();
        } catch (InterruptedException e1) {
            e1.printStackTrace();
        }
    }
    screen.getBtn().setLabel("Called");
    screen.getBtn().repaint();
}

It works this way, but in my "real world" scenario, this implementation would cause quite a mess when it comes to coupling. Any pointers?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

your cr.start() returns immediately.

What you want is to put the wait(screen) instead of after cr.start(), and remove wait(screen) from run() method.

This way the thread will show a dialog and exit. Once the dialog is closed, screen will be notified, and your createGui().actionPerformed() will wake up.

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I had tried that before, the dialog becomes irresponsive. I suppose that its due to the fact that I wait for the thread created in cr.start() finishes its execution before calling wait() in the main thread, resulting in only one thread waiting while there's no other to call notify() –  S.O. Apr 7 '11 at 19:14
    
if you get rid of synchronized() block inside your thread, you should be fine –  iluxa Apr 7 '11 at 19:34

you can't use multiple threads with swing/awt, and you can't "wait" on the thread which is running the gui, or it will stop working. the way to do asynchronous work which involves the gui is to spawn a separate thread (as you are doing), and then have that thread use SwingUtilities.invokeLater() whenever it needs to "update" the gui.

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