Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

How does Facebook store user information?

share|improve this question
7  
Very carefully (one would hope). –  Jeff Apr 7 '11 at 19:47
3  
Facebook uses computers to store a lot of the user information. Is there something more specific you'd like to know? –  S.Lott Apr 7 '11 at 19:48
4  
Monkeys write them down on paper :). –  kapa Apr 7 '11 at 19:49
2  
@S.Lott Computers? I think you've been mis-informed. I have it on good authority that instead of using a large geographically distributed key/value system, everything is in fact stored on punch-cards. –  middaparka Apr 7 '11 at 19:49
1  
@middaparka: No no you've got it all wrong. Everything that is entered into Facebook is then sent to an isolated monastery in northern Europe where monks work all day and night to memorize incoming data. When a request for data comes in, it gets sent to the monastary and the monk responsible for remembering the information recites it to an operator that keys it in and sends it back. –  FrustratedWithFormsDesigner Apr 7 '11 at 19:52
show 1 more comment

closed as not a real question by Jeff, middaparka, kapa, Gazler, NikiC Apr 7 '11 at 19:52

It's difficult to tell what is being asked here. This question is ambiguous, vague, incomplete, overly broad, or rhetorical and cannot be reasonably answered in its current form. For help clarifying this question so that it can be reopened, visit the help center.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

1 Answer

If memory serves: In MySQL InnoDB table type (custom patches), sharded by user id (other things are shared by location, not user table).

Their patches are online https://www.facebook.com/note.php?note_id=332335025932

share|improve this answer
    
That's really a tiny part of a much bigger picture. Facebook developed and released (as open source project under Apache) the NOSql engine Cassandra, which allows great performance over huge clusters with very big amounts of data... –  Galz Apr 7 '11 at 21:36
    
True, but it's not how they're storing their user data. –  preinheimer Apr 7 '11 at 21:53
add comment

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.