Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

EDIT: Paul has solved this one below. Thanks!

I'm trying to resample (upscale) a 3x3 matrix to 5x5, filling in the intermediate points with either interpolate.interp2d or interpolate.RectBivariateSpline (or whatever works).

If there's a simple, existing function to do this, I'd like to use it, but I haven't found it yet. For example, a function that would work like:

# upscale 2x2 to 4x4
matrixSmall = ([[-1,8],[3,5]])
matrixBig = matrixSmall.resample(4,4,cubic)

So, if I start with a 3x3 matrix / array:

0,-2,0
-2,11,-2
0,-2,0

I want to compute a new 5x5 matrix ("I" meaning interpolated value):

0, I[1,0], -2, I[3,0], 0
I[0,1], I[1,1], I[2,1], I[3,1], I[4,1]
-2, I[1,2], 11, I[3,2], -2
I[0,3], I[1,3], I[2,3], I[3,3], I[4,3]
0, I[1,4], -2, I[3,4], 0

I've been searching and reading up and trying various different test code, but I haven't quite figured out the correct syntax for what I'm trying to do. I'm also not sure if I need to be using meshgrid, mgrid or linspace in certain lines.

EDIT: Fixed and working Thanks to Paul

import numpy, scipy
from scipy import interpolate

kernelIn = numpy.array([[0,-2,0],
             [-2,11,-2],
             [0,-2,0]])

inKSize = len(kernelIn)
outKSize = 5

kernelOut = numpy.zeros((outKSize,outKSize),numpy.uint8)

x = numpy.array([0,1,2])
y = numpy.array([0,1,2])

z = kernelIn

xx = numpy.linspace(x.min(),x.max(),outKSize)
yy = numpy.linspace(y.min(),y.max(),outKSize)

newKernel = interpolate.RectBivariateSpline(x,y,z, kx=2,ky=2)

kernelOut = newKernel(xx,yy)

print kernelOut
share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 7 down vote accepted

Only two small problems:

1) Your xx,yy is outside the bounds of x,y (you can extrapolate, but I'm guessing you don't want to.)

2) Your sample size is too small for a kx and ky of 3 (default). Lower it to 2 and get a quadratic fit instead of cubic.

import numpy, scipy
from scipy import interpolate

kernelIn = numpy.array([
    [0,-2,0],
    [-2,11,-2],
    [0,-2,0]])

inKSize = len(kernelIn)
outKSize = 5

kernelOut = numpy.zeros((outKSize),numpy.uint8)

x = numpy.array([0,1,2])
y = numpy.array([0,1,2])

z = kernelIn

xx = numpy.linspace(x.min(),x.max(),outKSize)
yy = numpy.linspace(y.min(),y.max(),outKSize)

newKernel = interpolate.RectBivariateSpline(x,y,z, kx=2,ky=2)

kernelOut = newKernel(xx,yy)

print kernelOut
##[[  0.      -1.5     -2.      -1.5      0.    ]
## [ -1.5      5.4375   7.75     5.4375  -1.5   ]
## [ -2.       7.75    11.       7.75    -2.    ]
## [ -1.5      5.4375   7.75     5.4375  -1.5   ]
## [  0.      -1.5     -2.      -1.5      0.    ]]
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks very much for the speedy solution! That's exactly what I was looking for. I had tried linspace before, but with the wrong formatting and I completely missed kx,ky. –  moski Apr 7 '11 at 20:08

If you are using scipy already, I think scipy.ndimage.interpolate.zoom can do what you need:

import numpy
import scipy.ndimage

a = numpy.array([[0.,-2.,0.], [-2.,11.,-2.], [0.,-2.,0.]])
out = numpy.round(scipy.ndimage.interpolation.zoom(a, 5./3), 1, order = 2)

print out
#[[  0.   -1.   -2.   -1.    0. ]
# [ -1.    1.8   4.5   1.8  -1. ]
# [ -2.    4.5  11.    4.5  -2. ]
# [ -1.    1.8   4.5   1.8  -1. ]
# [  0.   -1.   -2.   -1.    0. ]]

Here the "zoom factor" is 5./3 because we are going from a 3x3 array to a 5x5 array. If you read the docs, it says that you can also specify the zoom factor independently for the two axes, which means you can upscale non-square matrices as well. By default, it uses third order spline interpolation, which I am not sure is best.

I tried it on some images and it works nicely.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for pointing that out. I hadn't found that function. I'll give that a try too. I wonder what's causing the significant difference in interpolated output values between this nd.image.interpolate.zoom and interpolate.RectBivariateSpline. –  moski Apr 7 '11 at 20:55

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.