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Is it possible, other than what I'm doing because it doesn't seem to work, to do this? I want to be able to have subclasses that are under a class to use the CSS specifically for that class.subclass.

CSS

.area1
{
	border:1px solid black;
}
.area1.item
{
    color:red;
}
.area2
{
    border:1px solid blue;
}
.area2.item
{
    color:blue;
}

HTML

<div class="area1">
    <table>
    	<tr>
    		<td class="item">Text Text Text</td>
    		<td class="item">Text Text Text</td>
    	</tr>
    </table>
</div>
<div class="area2"> 
    <table>
    	<tr>
    		<td class="item">Text Text Text</td>
    		<td class="item">Text Text Text</td>
    	</tr>
    </table>
</div>

So that I can just use class="item" for the elements under the parent css class "area1","area2". I know I can use class="area1 item" to get this to work, but I don't understand why it has to be so verbose about it. Shouldn't the css subclass look at what parent class it is under in order to define it?

Note: this works in IE (using 7 right now), but in FF it does not, so I'm assuming this isn't a CSS standard way of doing something.

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11 Answers 11

up vote 77 down vote accepted

Just need to add a space:

.area2 .item
{
    ...
}
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that did it. I knew it had to be something simple like that. Thanks! –  Ryan A Feb 17 '09 at 21:18
    
I don't really use subclasses myself......can anyone give me a reason where this would be necessary? –  patricksweeney Feb 18 '09 at 4:12
1  
Subclasses are just one more way of adding additional specificity to your CSS rules where it's appropriate. You can have a main class, but you can alter the rule for an element based on where it is in the document. –  bigmattyh Feb 18 '09 at 6:28

FYI, when you define a rule like you did above, with two selectors chained together:

.area1.item
{
    color:red;
}

It means:

Apply this style to any element that has both the class "area1" and "item".

Such as:

<div class="area1 item">

Sadly it doesn't work in IE6, but that's what it means.

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This was actually the thing I was looking for, thanks for explaining it! –  F-3000 May 18 at 13:12

Your problem seems to be a missing space between your two classes in the CSS:

.area1.item
{
    color:red;
}

Should be

.area1 .item
{
    color:red;
}
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do you want to force only children to be selected? http://css.maxdesign.com.au/selectutorial/selectors_child.htm

.area1
{
        border:1px solid black;
}
.area1>.item
{
    color:red;
}
.area2
{
    border:1px solid blue;
}
.area2>.item
{
    color:blue;
}
share|improve this answer
1  
Not what I was thinking, but this is good info for if I want only direct children. Thanks! –  Ryan A Feb 17 '09 at 21:20
    
Didn't knew about that one. Thanks for that MrChrister –  Sebastian Sastre Dec 29 '13 at 22:54

Just put a space between .area1 and .item, e.g:

.area1 .item
{
    color:red;
}

this style applies to elements with class item inside an element with class area1.

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Just put a space between your classes

.area1 .item
{
    ...
}

Here's a very good reference for CSS Selectors.

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That is the backbone of CSS, the "cascade" in Cascading Style Sheets.

If you write your CSS rules in a single line it makes it easier to see the structure:

.area1 .item { color:red; }
.area2 .item { color:blue; }
.area2 .item span { font-weight:bold; }

Using multiple classes is also a good intermediate/advanced use of CSS, unfortunately there is a well known IE6 bug which limits this usage when writing cross browser code:

<div class="area1 larger"> .... </div>

.area1 { width:200px; }
.area1.larger { width:300px; }

IE6 IGNORES the first selector in a multi-class rule, so IE6 actually applies the .area1.larger rule as

/*.area1*/.larger { ... }

Meaning it will affect ALL .larger elements.

It's a very nasty and unfortunate bug (one of many) in IE6 that forces you to pretty much never use that feature of CSS if you want one clean cross-browser CSS file.

The solution then is to use CSS classname prefixes to avoid colliding wiht generic classnames:

.area1 { ... }
.area1.area1Larger { ... }

.area2.area2Larger { ... }

May as well use just one class, but that way you can keep the CSS in the logic you intended, while knowing that .area1Larger only affects .area1, etc.

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Following on from kR105's reply above:

My problem was similar to that of the OP (Original Poster), only occurred outside a table, so the subclasses were not called from within the scope of the parent class (the table), but outside of it, so I had to ADD selectors, as kR105 mentioned.

Here was the problem: I had two boxes (divs), each with the same border-radius (HTML5), padding and margin, but needed to make them different colors. Rather than repeat those 3 parameters for each color class, I wanted a "superclass" to contain border-radius/padding/margin, then just individual "subclasses" to express their differences (double quotes around each as they're not really subclasses - see my later post). Here's how it worked out:

HTML:

<body>
  <div class="box box1"> Hello my color is RED </div>
  <div class="box box2"> Hello my color is BLUE </div>
</body>

CSS:

div.box {border-radius:20px 20px 20px 20px; padding:10px; margin:10px}
div.box1 {border:3px solid red; color:red}
div.box2 {border:3px solid blue; color:blue}

Hope someone finds this helpful.

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The class you apply on the div can be used to as a reference point to style elements with that div, for example.

<div class="area1">
    <table>
        <tr>
                <td class="item">Text Text Text</td>
                <td class="item">Text Text Text</td>
        </tr>
    </table>
</div>


.area1 { border:1px solid black; }

.area1 td { color:red; } /* This will effect any TD within .area1 */

To be super semantic you should move the class onto the table.

    <table class="area1">
        <tr>
                <td>Text Text Text</td>
                <td>Text Text Text</td>
        </tr>
    </table>
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you can also have two classes within an element like this

<div class = "item1 item2 item3"></div>

each item in the class is its own class

.item1 {
  background-color:black;
}

.item2 {
  background-color:green;
}

.item3 {
  background-color:orange;
}
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kR105 wrote:

you can also have two classes within an element like this

<div class = "item1 item2 item3"></div

I can't see the value of this, since by the principle of cascading styles, the last one takes precedence. For example, if in my earlier example I changed the HTML to read

 <div class="box1 box2"> Hello what is my color? </div>

the box's border and text would be blue, since .box2's style assigns these values.

Also in my earlier post I should have emphasized that adding selectors as I did is not the same as creating a subclass within a class (the first solution in this thread), though the effect is similar.

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