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I am creating a library in C# and I want the library to be as efficient as possible. Here are the two styles that I have developed and I would like to know if one was faster than the other one, if so why? Or if they have the same effect.

Style 1

Object[] row;
while (sqlDataReader.Read())
{
    row = new Object[sqlDataReader.FieldCount];
    for (int i = 0; i < row.Length; i++)
        row[i] = sqlDataReader[i];
    databaseResults.Add(row);
}

Style 2:

while (sqlDataReader.Read())
{
    Object[] row; = new Object[sqlDataReader.FieldCount];
    for (int i = 0; i < row.Length; i++)
        row[i] = sqlDataReader[i];
    databaseResults.Add(row);
}
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1  
Of course the consumer of this call would have to cast everything back up to use it. – asawyer Apr 7 '11 at 20:35

AFAIK, they will have identical performance. The first style might hold on to the reference to row depending on what you are doing after the while loop so I'd go with Style 2 if you are not intending to use row afterwards.

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They're both going to run at the same speed, because declaring Object[] row does not consume significant (any?) CPU time. Specifically, it's not going to consume any more time whether you declare it within the loop, or outside of it. The place where you declare it will only control the scope, and the Garbage Collector is going to behave the same either way.

That said, it's cleaner to go with Style 2.

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In C# the declaration of a variable inside or outside of a loop (usually*) makes no difference in the compiled code when the variable is only used inside the loop. The optimizer is going to make them the same, since they behave identically.

*The exception is when the variable is captured in an anonymous method. When that happens then the declaration scope affects the meaning of the program. A new instance of a captured variable declared inside the loop will be created each time the loop executes, while one declared outside will be reused through all iterations.

Since there are no anonymous methods in the code indicated, this exception does not apply.

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