Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Is this approach unsafe?

#include <tr1/memory>

Foo * createFoo()
{
  return new Foo(5);
}

int main()
{
  std::tr1::shared_ptr<Foo> bar(create());

  return 0;
}

Or would it be preferable for createFoo to return a shared_ptr<Foo> object?

share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

The example is safe: if the shared_ptr constructor throws an exception, it delete's its pointer argument before throwing (draft standard, 20.9.11.2.1).

Whether create should return a shared_ptr depends on what its clients may reasonably want to do with its result. If all they ever do is wrap it in a shared_ptr, then return that for extra safety. (Yes, shared_ptr may introduce some coupling.)

share|improve this answer

Your example is safe the way you've written it. However, you could make it even more leak-proof by having your factory method createFoo() return an auto pointer instead of a raw pointer. That way you are guaranteed that there will be no leaks.

So what you'd get is:

#include <memory>
#include <tr1/memory>

std::auto_ptr<Foo> createFoo()
{
  return std::auto_ptr<Foo>(new Foo(5));
}

int main()
{
  std::tr1::shared_ptr<Foo> bar(createFoo());

  return 0;
}

It is of course also possible to have your factory method return a shared_ptr, but this might be seen as overkill, since the returned pointer will generally go out of scope quite quickly, since it will be used in an assignment or constructor. Furthermore, using auto_ptr states the intended use of the pointer more clearly, which is always a plus when people unfamiliar with your code have to understand it.

share|improve this answer
    
Why is it more leakproof? If the new Foo(5) fails, it destructs anything constructed and frees the memory. A return of a pointer isn't going to fail, and once it's in the shared_ptr it's fine. –  David Thornley Apr 7 '11 at 21:30
    
It would be better not using auto_ptr. In this case, returning a simple pointer will be fine. I agree with David. –  xis Apr 7 '11 at 21:38
2  
With the simple pointer version, it is possible to do Foo * p = createFoo(); p = createFoo();. If you don't always assign the returned pointer from the factory method to a smart pointer, you can leak memory, with the auto_ptr solution, that's not possible. –  Darhuuk Apr 7 '11 at 21:41
1  
Given the TR1 restriction (=no unique_ptr), I think returning a std::auto_ptr is a good thing. The caller can .release() the pointer if he wants, or use it to construct a shared_ptr. If C++0x's unique_ptr was available I'd prefer that though. +1 –  Paul Groke Apr 7 '11 at 23:07
    
@Darhuuk: I'm usually not worried about memory leaks with things like that; a small, simple function can usually be proved correct by examination. If it were a more complicated function, I might go for the auto_ptr. –  David Thornley Apr 8 '11 at 13:25

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.