Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm having the following issue when trying to update my entity:

"A collection with cascade=”all-delete-orphan” was no longer referenced by the owning entity instance".

I have a parent entity and it has a Set<...> of some children entities. When I try to update it, I get all the references to be setted to this collections and set it.

The following code represents my mapping:

@OneToMany(mappedBy = "parentEntity", fetch = FetchType.EAGER)
@Cascade({ CascadeType.ALL, CascadeType.DELETE_ORPHAN })
public Set<ChildEntity> getChildren() {
    return this.children;
}

I've tried to clean the Set<..> only, according to this: How to "possible" solve the problem but it didn't work.

If you have any ideas, please let me know.

Thanks!

share|improve this question

5 Answers 5

Check all of the places where you are assigning something to sonEntities. The link you referenced distinctly points out creating a new HashSet but you can have this error anytime you reassign the set. For example:

public void setChildren(Set<SonEntity> aSet)
{
    this.sonEntities = aSet; //This will override the set that Hibernate is tracking.
}

Usually you want to only "new" the set once in a constructor. Any time you want to add or delete something to the list you have to modify the contents of the list instead of assigning a new list.

To add children:

public void addChild(SonEntity aSon)
{
    this.sonEntities.add(aSon);
}

To remove children:

public void removeChild(SonEntity aSon)
{
    this.sonEntities.remove(aSon);
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks guy. I'll try this approaching and post a feedback. –  axcdnt Apr 7 '11 at 21:32
1  
Actually, my problem was about equals and hashcode of my entities. A legacy code can bring a lot of problems, never forget to check it out. All I've done was just keep delete-orphan strategy and correct equals and hashcode. –  axcdnt Apr 10 '11 at 22:04
1  
I'm glad you solved your problem. equals and hashcode have bitten me a few times with Hibernate. Instead of updating the title of the question with "[Solved]" you should go ahead and post your answer and then mark it as the accepted answer. –  brainimus Apr 11 '11 at 13:47

Thanks a lot for the answer...

the method

public void setChildren(Set<SonEntity> aSet) {     
    this.sonEntities = aSet;  
} 

works if the parentEntity is detached and again if we update it.
But if the entity is not detached from per context, (ie find and update operations are in the same transaction) the below mthod works.

public void setChildren(Set<SonEntity> aSet) {     
    //this.sonEntities = aSet; //This will override the set that Hibernate is tracking. 
    this.sonEntities.clear();
    this.sonEntities.addAll(aSet);
} 
share|improve this answer
    
@Skuld I have a similar problem and I applied your solution (in the setter method I clear the children collection - this.children.clear() - and I added the new children - this.children.addAll(children)). This change didn't fix my problem. I still get the "A collection with cascade="all-delete-orphan" was no longer referenced by the owning entity instance" exception. Do you have an idea why? Thank you very much! –  ovdsrn Dec 12 '12 at 10:42
    
@ovdsrn Sorry this isn't my answer, I just sorted out the formatting of the answer, the original author (kmmanu) might be able to help you out (or alt you might want to start a new question if your scenario is different to the original question asked here) Good luck –  Skuld Dec 27 '12 at 9:48
    
This works well, but not so good when the children are contained in a nested hibernate component and the component is made null in it's Entity. Then you get the same error. This is because the owner of the children is the root Entity and not the component that is made null... A such, a component is never allowed to become null, but rather should result in a forward to a destroy() method in the child... At least, I don't know a better solution... It's a kind of collection clear() construction but then on a component through destroy()... –  edbras Jul 9 at 14:47
    
See also this post for more details of above: stackoverflow.com/questions/4770262/… –  edbras Jul 9 at 14:56
up vote 4 down vote accepted

Actually, my problem was about equals and hashcode of my entities. A legacy code can bring a lot of problems, never forget to check it out. All I've done was just keep delete-orphan strategy and correct equals and hashcode.

share|improve this answer
    
please, an example of a well made equals and hashCode methods? because i have a lot of problems: or i can't update my set or i get a StackOverflow error. i opened a question here: stackoverflow.com/questions/24737145/… . thanks –  lethal.industry Jul 14 at 15:36

I had the same error. The problem for me was, that after saving the entity the mapped collection was still null and when trying to update the entity the exception was thrown. What helped for me: Saving the entity, then make a refresh (collection is no longer null) and then perform the update. Maybe initializing the collection with new ArrayList() or something might help as well.

share|improve this answer

When I read in various places that hibernate didn't like you to assign to a collection, I assumed that the safest thing to do would obviously be to make it final like this:

class User {
  private final Set<Role> roles = new HashSet<>();

public void setRoles(Set<Role> roles) {
  this.roles.retainAll(roles);
  this.roles.addAll(roles);
}
}

However, this doesn't work, and you get the dreaded "no longer referenced" error, which is actually quite misleading in this case.

It turns out that hibernate calls your setRoles method AND it wants its special collection class installed here, and won't accept your collection class. This had me stumped for a LONG time, despite reading all the warnings about not assigning to your collection in your set method.

So I changed to this:

public class User {
  private Set<Role> roles = null;

  public void setRoles(Set<Role> roles) {
  if (this.roles == null) {
    this.roles = roles;
  } else {
    this.roles.retainAll(roles);
   this.roles.addAll(roles);
  }
}
}

So that on the first call, hibernate installs its special class, and on subsequent calls you can use the method yourself without wrecking everything. If you want to use your class as a bean, you probably need a working setter, and this at least seems to work.

share|improve this answer
    
Why are you calling retainAll()? Why not clear() followed by addAll()? –  edbras Jul 9 at 13:26

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.