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This is a follow-up to a question I asked yesterday.

I have a userscript (kind of like GreaseMonkey script, but for Chrome).

The idea is to add a textbox and a button to the page. Then when the user clicks the button, it kicks off a function that does stuff. So I inject the textbox, button and the function into the page, but when the user clicks the button, the Chrome console tells me "Uncaught TypeError: object is not a function". So obviously it does not see the function I just injected and that is specified in the onclick event for the button.

So I have code like this:

initialize();

function initialize() { 
    var dropDown = document.getElementById("tstGlobalNavigation_ddlChooseProject"); 

    // add a textbox 
    dropDown.innerHTML = dropDown.innerHTML + "&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;<input type='text' name='txtSearch' style='position:absolute;top:8px;left:800px;width:50px' >";

    // add a button 
    dropDown.innerHTML = dropDown.innerHTML + "&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;<input type='button' name='btnSearch' value='Go' onclick='fn()' style='position:absolute;top:8px;left:860px;width:35px'>";

    addScript("var obj = document.getElementById('txtSearch'); " 
    + "if (obj != null) { " 
    + " var incidentId = document.getElementById('txtSearch').value; " 
    + " var currentURL = location.href; " 
    + " var splitResult = currentURL.split('/'); " 
    + " var projectId = splitResult[4]; " 
    + " location.href = 'http://dev.myApp.com/ProductTeam/' + projectId + '/Incident/' + incidentId + '.aspx'; " 
    + " }" 
    , "fn"); 
}

function addScript(contents, id) { 
    var head, script; 
    head = document.getElementsByTagName('head')[0]; 
    script = document.getElementById(id); 
    if(script != undefined) { 
    head.removeChild(script); 
    } 
    script = document.createElement('script'); 
    script.type = 'text/javascript'; 
    script.id = id; 
    script.innerHTML = contents; 
    head.appendChild(script); 
}

What am I missing here?

share|improve this question
    
Where do you bind the event handler? –  Dexter Apr 7 '11 at 21:47
    
this code is not the source of the problem. It would be helpful if you posted the code where you bind the event handler –  Alex Apr 7 '11 at 21:49
    
@Alex, @Dexter - sorry, somehow the handler got eaten in the copy/paste operation. –  AngryHacker Apr 7 '11 at 21:56
    
@Brock: this is clearly not a dup. –  Matt Ball Apr 7 '11 at 21:57
    
@Brock, the dupe you linked to is the same question I specified as being a follow-up. –  AngryHacker Apr 7 '11 at 22:01
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3 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You're not calling the function you created, you're using the id that you give to the script tag... Try changing the code to

addScript("function fn() { var obj = document.getElementById('txtSearch'); " 
    + "if (obj != null) { " 
    + " var incidentId = document.getElementById('txtSearch').value; " 
    + " var currentURL = location.href; " 
    + " var splitResult = currentURL.split('/'); " 
    + " var projectId = splitResult[4]; " 
    + " location.href = 'http://dev.myApp.com/ProductTeam/' + projectId + '/Incident/' + incidentId + '.aspx'; " 
    + " } }" 
    , "fn"); 

and you will have a fn() function that can be called

share|improve this answer
    
You are the man! Worked! –  AngryHacker Apr 7 '11 at 22:03
    
Ah, I was wondering why he was assigning an ID to the script tag. –  Matt Ball Apr 7 '11 at 22:03
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The problem is that you're trying to use the onclick element attribute to bind an event handler. These attributes are only parsed when the page is first loaded, at which time the function you're trying to bind as the callback doesn't exist.

Avoid binding event handlers in element on* attributes whenever possible. This is called writing unobtrusive JavaScript.

That said, if you absolutely must stick with using onclick, you can bind to a dummy function which does nothing but turn around and call the function that you inject:

<button onclick="wrapper()"

Where wrapper looks something like this:

function wrapper() {
    return functionThatWillEventuallyBeInjected();
}
share|improve this answer
    
I think you are wrong. Why? Because in the chrome console, I get Uncaught TypeError: object is not a function error when I click the button, which means that the onclick event does fire. –  AngryHacker Apr 7 '11 at 22:00
    
Right: the onclick fires but it's bound to something that isn't defined. –  Matt Ball Apr 7 '11 at 22:01
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I'm not sure you can actually create script tags on the fly and push content in it.

You could instead create the script tag and modify the src attribute to some JS file:

var script = document.createElement("script");
script.type = "text/javascript";
script.src = "path/to/your/javascript.js";
document.body.appendChild(script);

If you really need to execute a code stored in a string, maybe you could simply eval() it when required!

share|improve this answer
    
You can; I answered the OP's question yesterday and made sure the code works. Perhaps you missed the demo in my answer (on the earlier question). –  Matt Ball Apr 7 '11 at 21:54
    
@Matt, I did look at the demo. I think there is some type of qualitative difference between injecting code via MooTools and UserScripts. I couldn't make it work using plain Javascript and UserScripts, as per example I posted. –  AngryHacker Apr 7 '11 at 21:58
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