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I'm using the UdpClient class to send packets.

It seems that there's a per-packet size limit, since big packets never reach their destination. I tried to lower the packet size, which allows the packets to reach their destination. I read somewhere that the "standard" packet size limit is 512 bytes.

But I still need to send objects that are way larger than 512 bytes.

So my question is: is there a built-in way in .NET to split up a byte array into smaller packets. Obviously, I need to reassemble the split packets afterwards, too.

I saw the SendFile method in the Socket class, which I guess should be able to automatically split up big files. But the method doesn't allow byte array input (only file name). So it would only work for sending data that is stored on the hard drive, not for in-memory data.

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Sending a large block of data by UDP seems a little odd, because with UDP the datagrams are not guaranteed to arrive at the other side. And even if they all do arrive they're not guaranteed to be in the original order. Are you sure you want to use UDP? –  Ciaran Keating Apr 7 '11 at 22:29
    
It's for a video game. I already use UDP for the input and game state transfers. But I think you're right, maybe a TCP connection would be better suited to send the maps, since these really need to be safely transferred. –  asmo Apr 8 '11 at 15:13
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"I read somewhere that the standard packet size limit is 512 bytes." Your source is wrong, the frame size for Ethernet is around triple that. –  Ben Voigt Apr 10 '11 at 21:51

2 Answers 2

The Send function in the Socket class takes a byte array as a parameter.

http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/w93yy28a.aspx

You can try this instead.

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The Send method send the byte array as one single packet. Therefore, the byte array can't be larger then 512 bytes. This is the source of my problem. –  asmo Apr 8 '11 at 15:14
    
you can loop through the byte array and send only 512 bytes at a time. The last packet containing 512 or less obviously. You would probably need to put a packet number into packets you send so you can reassemble them in the correct order. Other than that, most of the methods for sending data look like they only send a single byte array. –  MBU Apr 8 '11 at 18:34
up vote 0 down vote accepted

Sending a large block of data by UDP seems a little odd, because with UDP the datagrams are not guaranteed to arrive at the other side. And even if they all do arrive they're not guaranteed to be in the original order. Are you sure you want to use UDP?

Ciaran Keating was right. TCP was a better choice for my need.

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