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This question is from an Objective-C newbie, so please bear with me. I'm trying to make sounds in my classes and have been successful using NSBeep() but not NSSound. Here is an example. Notice that NSBeep(); and [[NSSound soundNamed:@"Frog"] play]; work fine in the "main.m" program, but only NSBeep(); works in the SoundMaker class. Any help in learning how to get NSSound to work is much appreciated.

main.m:

#import <Foundation/Foundation.h>
#import <AppKit/AppKit.h>
#import "SoundMaker.h"

int main() {
    NSAutoreleasePool *pool = [[NSAutoreleasePool alloc] init];

    NSLog(@"This is the main program.");
    NSBeep(); // Works fine.
    sleep(1);
    [[NSSound soundNamed:@"Frog"] play]; // Works fine.
    sleep(1);
    [SoundMaker makeSound]; // Only NSBeep() works.

    [pool drain];
    return 0;
}

SoundMaker.h:

#import <Foundation/Foundation.h>
#import <AppKit/AppKit.h>

@interface SoundMaker : NSObject
+(void) makeSound;
@end

SoundMaker.m:

#import "SoundMaker.h"

@implementation SoundMaker
+(void) makeSound
{
    NSLog(@"This is SoundMaker.");
    NSBeep(); // Works fine.
    sleep(1);
    [[NSSound soundNamed:@"Frog"] play]; // Doesn't work.
}
@end
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2 Answers

In Xcode, if you set a breakpoint, does it get hit?

I have started only recently myself, so the +(void) looks weird to me; the book I am using only teaches

- (return_variable)methodname

[Edit]

I just tested it, added

- (void)playFrog;

To my interface.

I then implemented the function

- (void)playFrog
{
[[NSSound soundName:@"Frog"] play];
}

I called it from somewhere else in my application like

[self playFrog];

That worked.

[Edit 2]

After reading your code again, I noticed you didn't alloc/init your SoundMaker...

Try

SoundMaker *mySoundMaker = [[SoundMaker alloc] init];
[mySoundMaker makeSound];
[mySoundMaker release];
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OK, are you ready for a weird one? I'm enough of a newbie that I don't know how to use breakpoints yet. Instead, I added an NSLog statement following SoundMaker's NSSound statement and started to hear a sound. So instead I tried a sleep(1); statement, and lo and behold, I can now hear the "Frog" sound in all its glory! So all that is needed is to follow the NSSound statement with a sleep(1); statement to make it work. –  scolfax Apr 7 '11 at 22:34
    
Thank you for that input. As noted, the testing prompted by your suggestions resulted in finding the solution. Incidentally, if I understand things correctly, since the "makeSound" message refers a class method and not an instance method ("+(void)"), I don't believe it is necessary to alloc/init. –  scolfax Apr 7 '11 at 22:47
    
Ahh, ok, so the + is like a (C#) static method? Good to know :) –  NKCSS Apr 8 '11 at 6:46
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up vote 0 down vote accepted

So as noted, the solution is to add a sleep(...); statement following NSSound. Here is the change to SoundMaker.m that works:

#import "SoundMaker.h"

@implementation SoundMaker
+(void) makeSound
{
    NSLog(@"This is SoundMaker.");
    NSBeep(); // Works fine.
    sleep(1);
    [[NSSound soundNamed:@"Frog"] play]; // Works fine.
    sleep(1); // This added statement allows the preceding "play" message to work.
}
@end
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