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Am new to the world of development and am just starting to pick up PHP. I have basic form that attempts to validate the checkboxes the user has selected or checked. My code is below. The question I have is why is that when I have the order of my form as follows, the form does not pass the value NET, PHP or RUBY and the values that are costantly passed are no.

--- Form code that does not work ---

<form name="checkboxes" method="post" action="form_sample_checkboxes.php">
        <input type="checkbox" name="ch1" value="net" <?php print $ch1status ?>>.NET
            <input type="hidden" name="ch1" value="no">


        <input type="checkbox" name="ch2" value="php" <?php print $ch2status ?>>PHP
        <input type="hidden" name="ch2" value="no">


        <input type="checkbox" name="ch3" value="ruby" <?php print $ch3status ?>>Ruby on Rails
        <input type="hidden" name="ch3" value="no">

        <input type="submit" name="submit" value="submit">

However if my code is as follows;

<form name="checkboxes" method="post" action="form_sample_checkboxes.php">
        <input type="hidden" name="ch1" value="no">
        <input type="checkbox" name="ch1" value="net" <?php print $ch1status ?>>.NET

        <input type="hidden" name="ch2" value="no">
        <input type="checkbox" name="ch2" value="php" <?php print $ch2status ?>>PHP

        <input type="hidden" name="ch3" value="no">
        <input type="checkbox" name="ch3" value="ruby" <?php print $ch3status ?>>Ruby on Rails

        <input type="submit" name="submit" value="submit">
    </form>

The boxes appear checked. The entire code below.

<?php

$ch1status = "unchecked";
$ch2status = "unchecked";
$ch3status = "unchecked";

if(isset($_POST["submit"])) {

        if(isset($_POST["ch1"])) {
            if($_POST["ch1"] == "net") {
                $ch1status = "checked";
            }
        }

        if(isset($_POST["ch2"])) {
            if($_POST["ch2"] == "php") {
                $ch2status = "checked";
            }
        }

        if(isset($_POST["ch3"])) {
            if($_POST["ch3"] == "ruby") {
                $ch3status = "checked";
            }
        }

        if ($_POST["ch1"] == "no" && $_POST["ch2"] == "no" && $_POST["ch3"] == "no") {
            print "There is no such choice";
        }

}

?>
<html>
<head>
    <title>Sample form checkbxoes</title>
</head>
<body>
    <form name="checkboxes" method="post" action="form_sample_checkboxes.php">
        <input type="hidden" name="ch1" value="no">
        <input type="checkbox" name="ch1" value="net" <?php print $ch1status ?>>.NET

        <input type="hidden" name="ch2" value="no">
        <input type="checkbox" name="ch2" value="php" <?php print $ch2status ?>>PHP

        <input type="hidden" name="ch3" value="no">
        <input type="checkbox" name="ch3" value="ruby" <?php print $ch3status ?>>Ruby on Rails

        <input type="submit" name="submit" value="submit">
    </form>

<?php

if(isset($_POST["submit"])) {
    if(isset($_POST["ch1"])) {
        print $_POST["ch1"];
        print $ch1status;
    }

    if(isset($_POST["ch2"])) {
        print $_POST["ch2"];
        print $ch2status;
    }

    if(isset($_POST["ch3"])) {
        print $_POST["ch3"];
        print $ch3status;
    }

}

echo "<pre>";
print_r($_POST);
echo "</pre>";

?>

</body>
</html>
        </form>

Also is there any other way of validating if the user has not selected any checkboxes as opposed to using hidden form fields.

share|improve this question

4 Answers 4

UNDEFINED INDEXES:

This is because checkboxes are only sent if they are checked. One thing you can do is always check the variable with isset (e.g. isset($_POST['ch1'])) before using them; another is to name your checkboxes the same thing with a [] following the name (e.g. name="languages[]") and then do something like this:

// Create a list of languages that are OK (remember, some users are malicious)
$languages = array('net','php','ruby');
// Compile a list of the answers the user picked; force it to be an 
// array by either explicitly casting to an array, or using an empty array
//  if none chosen
$picked = isset($_POST['languages']) ? (array)$_POST['languages'] : array();

// first, use array_intersect to remove entries present in one and not the other
// i.e. invalid entries from the client or entries not picked from the whole list
// then, "flip" the array so that the values become keys, 
// because isset is faster than in_array
$valid_langs = array_flip(array_intersect($languages, $picked));

// check on languages
if (isset($valid_langs['php'])) { /* PHP picked */ }
if (isset($valid_langs['net'])) { /* NET picked */ }
if (isset($valid_langs['ruby'])) { /* Ruby picked */ }

Simpler Solution:

<form>
    <input type="checkbox" name="php" value="yes" />
    <input type="checkbox" name="net" value="yes" />
    <input type="checkbox" name="ruby" value="yes" />
</form>

<?php
$php = $net = $ruby = 'unchecked';
if (!isset($_POST['php'],$_POST['net'],$_POST['ruby'])) {
    echo 'There is no such choice';
}
else {
    if (isset($_POST['php']) && $_POST['php'] == 'yes') {
        $php = 'checked';
    }
    if (isset($_POST['net']) && $_POST['new'] == 'yes') {
        $net = 'checked';
    }
    if (isset($_POST['ruby']) && $_POST['ruby'] == 'yes') {
        $ruby = 'checked';
    }
}
// ... snip ...

There are a great many ways to do this. Hopefully you will be interested in learning many of them.

share|improve this answer
    
Whow. That just flew past my head. Have no idea how arrays work nor statements such as $picked = isset($_POST['languages']) ? (array)$_POST['languages'] : array();. Is there something simpler for a beginner whilst I pick up what arrays are, how they work, etc? –  Monkey Apr 7 '11 at 23:08
    
sure, let me edit it. –  Dereleased Apr 7 '11 at 23:09
    
I've added in a simpler solution, though it's worth mentioning that $_POST is an array, so you're not entirely unfamiliar with them =) –  Dereleased Apr 7 '11 at 23:17
    
Wow, seems so much cleaner than my code. A question. 1. Why the declaration $php = $net = $ruby = 'unchecked'; I had no idea you could write isset($_POST['php'],$_POST['net'],$_POST['ruby']. I know that $_POST is an array however I don't know what an array does, when you use it, etc. –  Monkey Apr 7 '11 at 23:24
    
That's to initialize them beforehand, not really necessary in PHP, unless of course there could be a logic error later on if they aren't set, such as if they are only set in an if condition that doesn't trigger and are used in an if condition later on. –  Phoenix Apr 8 '11 at 0:21

Its just a browser-issue and its quite simple: The elements have the same name and the later element overwrites the first one.

Another way of validating, if a checkbox is not checked is to check, if its set in the $POST-array. If its missing, its treated like "not checked".

share|improve this answer

You do not need those hidden fields. Remove them and it should work.

EDIT: Check out this modification

    $ch1status = "unchecked";
    $ch2status = "unchecked";
    $ch3status = "unchecked";

    if(isset($_POST["submit"])) {

        if(@$_POST["ch1"] != "") {
            $ch1status = "checked";
        }

        if(@$_POST["ch2"] != "") {
            $ch2status = "checked";
        }

        if(@$_POST["ch3"] != "") {
            $ch3status = "checked";
        }

        if (@$_POST["ch1"] . @$_POST["ch2"] . @$_POST["ch3"] == "") {
            print "There is no such choice";
        }

    }

?>
<html>
    <head>
        <title>Sample form checkbxoes</title>
    </head>
    <body>
        <form name="checkboxes" method="post" action="form_sample_checkboxes.php">
            <input type="checkbox" name="ch1" value="net" <?php echo $ch1status; ?>>.NET

            <input type="checkbox" name="ch2" value="php" <?php echo $ch2status; ?>>PHP

            <input type="checkbox" name="ch3" value="ruby" <?php echo $ch3status; ?>>Ruby on Rails

            <input type="submit" name="submit" value="submit">
        </form>

        <?php

            if(isset($_POST["submit"])) {
                if(isset($_POST["ch1"])) {
                    print $_POST["ch1"];
                    print $ch1status;
                }

                if(isset($_POST["ch2"])) {
                    print $_POST["ch2"];
                    print $ch2status;
                }

                if(isset($_POST["ch3"])) {
                    print $_POST["ch3"];
                    print $ch3status;
                }

            }

            echo "<pre>";
            print_r($_POST);
            echo "</pre>";

        ?>

    </body>
</html>
share|improve this answer
    
They don't. If I don't have the hidden form fields all I am displayed undefined index errors. –  Monkey Apr 7 '11 at 22:59
    
use isset($_POST['php']), etc, to verify the fields exist before trying to work with them. Checkboxes only create POST variables if they are checked. –  Dereleased Apr 7 '11 at 23:00
    
Thanks Dereleased however how do I use isset($_POST[]) with the statement "($_POST["ch1"] == "no" && $_POST["ch2"] == "no" && $_POST["ch3"] == "no")" i.e. how do I validate multiple form fields at the same time? –  Monkey Apr 7 '11 at 23:03
    
You have to do each individually. eg. if(isset($_POST['ch2'])) //do stuff –  Craig White Apr 7 '11 at 23:07
    
actually, isset() and unset() will both accept multiple arguments, e.g. isset($_POST['ch1'],$_POST['ch2'],$_POST['ch3']) -- note, this is pass/fail; if even one is not set, it returns false; it is also subject to short-circuit logic. –  Dereleased Apr 7 '11 at 23:08

Php is all server-side, so in order to keep them from submitting you'll need client-side validation. Easiest client-side validation is with javascript, or jQuery's Validation Plugin if you're already using jQuery (which you should be if you plan on using AJAX at any point).

And yes, you can get rid of those hidden inputs.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks Brian. Yes am aware that it is all server-side and I can use client-side validation however would like to learn how to validate data server side. –  Monkey Apr 7 '11 at 23:04
    
Also if I remove the hidden form fields, I get undefined index errors. –  Monkey Apr 7 '11 at 23:05
    
Never trust the client –  KingCrunch Apr 7 '11 at 23:21
    
Never trust the client? Really? I've found that client-side validation is a necessity. Ideally you use both, of course, but to dismiss it altogether is kinda dumb, especially when dealing with form submission. Block the submission at the client level and you save server load. Or are you the kind of guy who rolls with no CAPTCHA? –  SickHippie Apr 7 '11 at 23:28

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