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How do you calculate the server load of PHP/apache? I know in vBulletin forums there's the server load displayed like 0.03 0.01 0.04 but it's not really understandable to a average joe. So I thought about a 1-100 percentile scale. I wanted to display a server load visual that reads from a DIV:

$load = $serverLoad*100;
<div class=\"serverLoad\">
    <div style=\"width: $load%;\"></div>//show visual for server load on a 1-100 % scale
</div>
<p>Current server load is $load%</p>
</div>

However, I don't know how to detect server load. Is it possible to do turn this server load into a percentile scale? I don't know where to start. May someone please help me out?

Thanks.

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2  
The reason that the three values exist is that a single percentage metric doesn't really tell you anything. –  Lightness Races in Orbit Apr 7 '11 at 23:08

7 Answers 7

up vote 9 down vote accepted

I have a very old function that should still do the trick:

function getServerLoad($windows = false){
    $os=strtolower(PHP_OS);
    if(strpos($os, 'win') === false){
        if(file_exists('/proc/loadavg')){
            $load = file_get_contents('/proc/loadavg');
            $load = explode(' ', $load, 1);
            $load = $load[0];
        }elseif(function_exists('shell_exec')){
            $load = explode(' ', `uptime`);
            $load = $load[count($load)-1];
        }else{
            return false;
        }

        if(function_exists('shell_exec'))
            $cpu_count = shell_exec('cat /proc/cpuinfo | grep processor | wc -l');        

        return array('load'=>$load, 'procs'=>$cpu_count);
    }elseif($windows){
        if(class_exists('COM')){
            $wmi=new COM('WinMgmts:\\\\.');
            $cpus=$wmi->InstancesOf('Win32_Processor');
            $load=0;
            $cpu_count=0;
            if(version_compare('4.50.0', PHP_VERSION) == 1){
                while($cpu = $cpus->Next()){
                    $load += $cpu->LoadPercentage;
                    $cpu_count++;
                }
            }else{
                foreach($cpus as $cpu){
                    $load += $cpu->LoadPercentage;
                    $cpu_count++;
                }
            }
            return array('load'=>$load, 'procs'=>$cpu_count);
        }
        return false;
    }
    return false;
}

This returns processor load. You can also use memory_get_usage and memory_get_peak_usage for memory load.

If you can't handle finding percentages based on this... sigh, just post and we'll try together.

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This function in PHP might do that trick: sys_getloadavg().

Returns three samples representing the average system load (the number of processes in the system run queue) over the last 1, 5 and 15 minutes, respectively.

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function get_server_load()
{

    $serverload = array();

    // DIRECTORY_SEPARATOR checks if running windows
    if(DIRECTORY_SEPARATOR != '\\')
    {
        if(function_exists("sys_getloadavg"))
        {
            // sys_getloadavg() will return an array with [0] being load within the last minute.
            $serverload = sys_getloadavg();
            $serverload[0] = round($serverload[0], 4);
        }
        else if(@file_exists("/proc/loadavg") && $load = @file_get_contents("/proc/loadavg"))
        {
            $serverload = explode(" ", $load);
            $serverload[0] = round($serverload[0], 4);
        }
        if(!is_numeric($serverload[0]))
        {
            if(@ini_get('safe_mode') == 'On')
            {
                return "Unknown";
            }

            // Suhosin likes to throw a warning if exec is disabled then die - weird
            if($func_blacklist = @ini_get('suhosin.executor.func.blacklist'))
            {
                if(strpos(",".$func_blacklist.",", 'exec') !== false)
                {
                    return "Unknown";
                }
            }
            // PHP disabled functions?
            if($func_blacklist = @ini_get('disable_functions'))
            {
                if(strpos(",".$func_blacklist.",", 'exec') !== false)
                {
                    return "Unknown";
                }
            }

            $load = @exec("uptime");
            $load = explode("load average: ", $load);
            $serverload = explode(",", $load[1]);
            if(!is_array($serverload))
            {
                return "Unknown";
            }
        }
    }
    else
    {
        return "Unknown";
    }

    $returnload = trim($serverload[0]);

    return $returnload;
}
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some code i wrote to do that https://github.com/infinitas/infinitas/blob/beta/config/bootstrap.php#L296

which roughly equates to http://i.min.us/idf8UM.png

The numbers are pretty simple, 1.00 is your servers maximum load it can take without anything waiting. if its below 1, things will never be queued up waiting to process. above 1 means that there is something waiting to process.

btw, that is for a single core. for a quad core it would be 4.00 :)

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wow that's awesome... –  Kyle Apr 7 '11 at 23:26
    
tx, there is a lot of code that makes that, but all starts with what i pasted. here is some more if you like github.com/infinitas/infinitas/tree/beta/core/server_status –  dogmatic69 Apr 7 '11 at 23:29
    
Thank you for the scale. I was wondering what the numbers meant: ) –  Kyle Apr 8 '11 at 0:36

If "exec" is activated

/**
 * Return the current server load
 * It needs "exec" activated
 *
 * e.g.
 * 15:06:37 up 10 days,  5:59, 12 users,  load average: 1.40, 1.45, 1.33
 * returns
 * float(1.40)
 */
public function getServerLoad()
{
    preg_match('#(\d\.\d+),[\d\s\.]+,[\d\s\.]+$#', exec("uptime"), $m);
    return (float)$m[1];
}
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function _loadavg()
{
    if(class_exists("COM")) 
    {
      $wmi = new COM("WinMgmts:\\\\.");
      $cpus = $wmi->InstancesOf("Win32_Processor");

      foreach ($cpus as $cpu) 
      {
       return $cpu->LoadPercentage;
      }
    } 
}
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Its Pretty easy in LAMP environment if you have proper permissions,

print_r(sys_getloadavg());

OUTPUT : Array ( [0] => 0 [1] => 0.01 [2] => 0.05 )

Array values are average load in the past 1, 5 and 15 minutes respectively.

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