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I am building an Android Application. I've noticed I am creating many repetitions of code similar to this in each of my classes:

Button buttonX = (Button)findViewById(R.id.buttonXName);
// Register the onClick listener with the implementation above
buttonX.setOnClickListener(new OnClickListener() {
    public void onClick(View v)
    {
        //DO SOMETHING! {RUN SOME FUNCTION ... DO CHECKS... ETC}
    } 
});

I now have 15 buttons and this is making my code ugly. Does anyone have a class or some examples, on how I can turn all these codes into something more efficient, so I can:

  1. Create the button OBJ {Button buttonX (Button)findViewById(R.id.buttonXName);}
  2. Set the listener {buttonX.setOnClickListener(new OnClickListener()}
  3. Determine if it was clicked {public void onClick(View v)}
  4. Then run specific code for each button?

If anyone knows anything, I'd appreciate it.

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6 Answers 6

up vote 25 down vote accepted

If you're targeting 1.6 or later, you can use the android:onClick xml attribute to remove some of the repetitive code. See this blog post by Romain Guy.

<Button 
   android:height="wrap_content"
   android:width="wrap_content"
   android:onClick="myClickHandler" />

class MyActivity extends Activity {
    public void myClickHandler(View target) {
        // Do stuff
    }
}
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Thank you. This is the perfect solution. –  user591162 Apr 8 '11 at 0:16
    
weird, this didn't work with my Dialog. I got an exception saying the handler didn't exist, but I did definitely define the handler! –  Someone Somewhere Oct 7 '11 at 21:27
    
@SomeoneSomewhere I think it search the view in the activity context. Handlers are out of game. –  Ilya_Gazman Jun 27 at 13:01

Implement OnClickListener() on your Activity...

public class MyActivity extends Activity implements View.OnClickListener {
}

For each button use...

buttonX.setOnClickListener(this);

In your Activity onClick() method test for which button it is...

@Override
public void onClick(View view) {
    if (View.equals(buttonX))
        // Do something
}

Also in onClick you could use view.getId() to get the resource ID and then use that in a switch/case block to identify each button and perform the relevant action.

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2  
Is this really an improvement? –  Corey Sunwold Apr 8 '11 at 0:02
    
@Corey Sunwold: It's all pretty subjective but using setOnClickListener(this); is a lot less ugly and reduces the button creation part of the code by not having inline onClick() declarations. Having only one onCLick() code block and, in particular, using a switch/case code block to identify which button is pressed puts an easy test in a separate area of main code. More than that, each 'case' could simply call a method in a 'helper' class located elsewhere. I can think of another way or two of doing things but code still has to go somewhere. –  Squonk Apr 8 '11 at 0:29
    
Squonk: That makes more sense, I hadn't considered it from a testability standpoint (probably should have). Thanks. –  Corey Sunwold Apr 8 '11 at 14:57

Since setOnClickListener is defined on View not Button, if you don't need the variable for something else, you could make it a little terser like this:

findViewById(R.id.buttonXName).setOnClickListener(new OnClickListener() {
    public void onClick(View v) {
    //DO SOMETHING! {RUN SOME FUNCTION ... DO CHECKS... ETC}
    } 
});
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Better solution will be working with a switch case like this:

public void registerButtons(){
    register(R.id.buttonName1);
    register(R.id.buttonName2);
    register(R.id.buttonName3);
}

private void register(int buttonResourceId){
    findViewById(buttonResourceId).setOnClickListener(buttonClickListener);
}

private OnClickListener buttonClickListener = new OnClickListener() {

    @Override
    public void onClick(View v){
        switch (v.getId()) {
            case R.id.buttonName1:
                // TODO Auto-generated method stub
                break;
            case R.id.buttonName2:
                // TODO Auto-generated method stub
                break;
            case View.NO_ID:
            default:
                // TODO Auto-generated method stub
                break;
        }
    }
};
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You can use array to handle several button click listener in android like this: here i am setting button click listener for n buttons by using array as:

Button btn[] = new Button[n]; 

NOTE: n is a constant positive integer

Code example:

//class androidMultipleButtonActions 
package a.b.c.app;

import android.app.Activity;
import android.os.Bundle;
import android.view.View;
import android.view.View.OnClickListener;
import android.widget.Button;

public class androidMultipleButtonActions extends Activity implements OnClickListener{
    Button btn[] = new Button[3];

    public void onCreate(Bundle savedInstanceState) {   
    super.onCreate(savedInstanceState);
        setContentView(R.layout.main);        
        btn[0] = (Button) findViewById(R.id.Button1);
        btn[1] = (Button) findViewById(R.id.Button2);
        btn[2] = (Button) findViewById(R.id.Button3);
        for(int i=0; i<3; i++){
            btn[i].setOnClickListener(this);
        }           
    }

    public void onClick(View v) {
        if(v == findViewById(R.id.Button1)){
            //do here what u wanna do.
        }
        else if(v == findViewById(R.id.Button2)){
            //do here what u wanna do.
        }
        else if(v == findViewById(R.id.Button3)){
            //do here what u wanna do.
        }
    }
}

Note: First write an main.xml file if u dont know how to write please mail to: wesagnd@yahoo.com

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I think you can usually do what you need in a loop, which is much better than many onClick methods if it can be done.

Check out this answer for a demonstration of how to use a loop for a similar problem. How you construct your loop will depend on the needs of your onClick functions and how similar they are to one another. The end result is much less repetitive code that is easier to maintain.

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