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I want to have objects with a series of properties and a single unique identifying key. As the key is unique, it can be used to pick out a particular set of properties. I want to be able to use the key when instantiating the object such that the properties associated with that key become attributes on that object.

The property specification will be regular (i.e. if one key has a property called description then so will every other key).

A Bad Example

This example is how I tried to initially approach the problem and is insufficient. I post it here to illustrate the problems with this approach.

I could have a Food class which has name and description attributes. In this case the name is supposed to be a unique key possessing, in this case, just a description.

public class Food {
  private String name;
  private String description;

  public Food(String name, String description) {
    this.name = name;
    this.description = description;
  }
}

Problems with this Approach

Firstly, whenever I create a particular kind of food, say pizza, I would have to enter the same description each time, say "A popular Italian dish". What I would prefer is to be able to create an object knowing only the name of the food and then have the rest of the attributes filled in for me. In other words, I should be able to just pass in pizza and the object will get created with an appropriate description.

Secondly, this example has no guaranteed uniqueness for the name attribute. I could create a pizza with a description of "A popular Italian dish" and another with a description of "Cheesy goodness!" However, I want the name to uniquely pick out a set of attributes. Of course an attribute could belong to multiple keys (pizza and pasta could both have a description of "An Italian dish") but key can only have a particular description.

Potential Solutions

I imagine that this will require at least 2 things:

  1. Some way of associating a name with a set of attributes. A HashMap seems ideal for this but where would be a good location to store it? It seems very strange to put it inside the Food class.

  2. Some creating class which handles the building of the Food objects (perhaps this would be a good location for the above HashMap?) I've looked into both the Factory and Builder patterns but the Factory seems to be for creating different subclasses and I want to be able to store 1000s of different item names (and not create 1000s of different subclasses). The Builder seems to be for specifying all of the attributes of an object in an easier way that remembering the order of parameters in a constructor whilst also guaranteeing that an object cannot be half-way instantiated but this seems to be almost the opposite of what I am looking for.

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If the Food name is not a unique identifier, how will you know what description to associate when you create a Food by only the name? –  Andy White Apr 8 '11 at 0:30
    
My apologies, I meant the example to be what I have currently but with problems, one of which being the lack of uniqueness. Uniqueness is something I want. I will edit my post to make that clearer. –  Rupert Madden-Abbott Apr 8 '11 at 0:33
    
do you use somekind of database or persistance api? i mean if you want your objects to poll the descriptions automatically they have to exist somewhere. –  ITroubs Apr 8 '11 at 0:37
    
actually this is a database task BUT since you want to do something impossible: create an object knowing only the name of the food and then have the rest of the attributes filled in for me combined with no guaranteed uniqueness for the name. Say i make a Pizza, how does my code decide wether to take "italian dish" or "cheesy"??? you either give the food class an int id and then create your objects just giving it the id and not the name, or you will have to generate a set of objects for each name and afterwards check how many items there are und use them all or just the first ... –  ITroubs Apr 8 '11 at 0:46
    
I want uniqueness. From the question: However, I want the name to uniquely pick out a set of attributes. i.e. the fact that the example can create 2 foods with the same name but different descriptions is a problem that I want to solve, not an objective I want to achieve. Sorry for the confusion! –  Rupert Madden-Abbott Apr 8 '11 at 0:50

4 Answers 4

Map is a good data structure to store the predefined attributes. But you need a code that copies the attribute to the object, i.e. calls code like the following:

food.setDescription(attrs.get("description"))

This code could be written in factory. Factory is not necessarily creates instances of different classes. It may create instances of the same class and initiate them.

Other approach is using pattern named template object. It means that your create several objects like pizza, pasta, stake, soup, etc. with already predefined properties. Then when you need to create yet another pizza you first create a copy of already existing pizza and then modify it to make your specific pizza. There are various ways in java to create copy of existing object: copy constructor, clone, serialization etc.

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You need a Factory and some overloaded constructors.

public class Food {

  private static final String DEFAULT_DESCRIPTION = "My favorite!";
  private String name;
  private String description;

  public Food(String name) { 
     this(name, DEFAULT_DESCRIPTION);
  }

  public Food(String name, String description) {
    this.name = name;
    this.description = description;
  }
}

class Pizza extends Food {

  private static final String DEFAULT_DESCRIPTION = "A popular Italian dish";

  public Pizza(String name)
  {
     super(name, Pizza.DEFAULT_DESCRIPTION);
  }

  public Pizza(String name, String description) {
     super(name, description);
  }

}

public class FoodFactory {

    private static final FoodFactory instance = new FoodFactory();

    private FoodFactory() {}

    public static FoodFactory getInstance() { retun this.instance; }

    public Food create(String name, String description) {
        // Here's where you can create different kinds of food based on your requirements
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks! I mentioned the possibility of a Factory pattern in my question but was concerned because I might want to have, say, 1000 different names. With this pattern that would require 1000 different subclasses which seems to be a bad thing to me. Is that feeling accurate and, so, is there a better way to solve this? –  Rupert Madden-Abbott Apr 8 '11 at 0:39
    
here is a little quote from the question I want to be able to store 1000s of different item names (and not create 1000s of different subclasses) just as a little hint! –  ITroubs Apr 8 '11 at 0:39

I agree that the hashmap is ideal, what I would recommend is some kind of mapper utility class that would take your names and descriptions from a xml file or database and then insert them into the hash map. This would be where your hashmap lives. Then you can use a factory to construct your food objects and inject the name and description dependencies from the hashmap.

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Thanks! I don't want to use a text file or database at the moment but I could just fill out the HashMap upon instantiating the mapper utility class. Do you know if this pattern has a name or any examples/explanations so I can investigate best practices and so forth? –  Rupert Madden-Abbott Apr 8 '11 at 0:42
    
I think this would be the closest representation martinfowler.com/eaaCatalog/dataMapper.html –  Dimitar Apr 8 '11 at 0:47
    
@ITroubs Good suggestion, I meant xml but wrote textfile for some reason. –  Dimitar Apr 8 '11 at 0:48

You can use an ORM framework(like Hibernate) to map the Java class to a database table, this will take care of managing and generating the primary key for the Java class.

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