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I have a structure:

struct data{
 int num1;
 int num2;
 int num3;
 int num4;
}

Now, I can convert individual elements and then put them in a buffer, but I want to copy the whole structure into a buffer(char buffer[sizeof(data)]).

Is there a way to copy ?

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3  
given that sizof(int) == 4 on most C compilers, you are going to have trouble getting that struct into an 8 byte buffer! –  Mitch Wheat Apr 8 '11 at 0:31
    
How about: char buffer[sizeof(struct data)]; –  Richard Schneider Apr 8 '11 at 0:39
    
You need a semicolon after the closing brace. Also, all you have defined is a type, not a value of that type. sizeof(data) is invalid unless you have defined a variable named data, or have a typedef struct data data. –  Jim Balter Apr 8 '11 at 1:03

5 Answers 5

up vote 3 down vote accepted

In your comment to this answer,

I am trying to copy this struct to a flash [memory chip]. And the Flash read/write API passes a string. – Punit 2 hours ago

you reveal that you've got an XY Problem - You're asking how to implement your idea of a solution, not how to solve your problem. You don't really want to copy a struct to a buffer, you want to write data in your struct to Flash using an API that requires a char * argument.

Others have pointed out that memcpy will do what you want. But they all involve allocating memory for this buffer in RAM. Using these approaches will work, but they'll waste time and memory. Assuming that your Flash API has a function to the effect of:

int WriteBlock(int address, char *data, int length);

and you've stored your structure in a variable called data_var, you can use your API in an identical fashion to memcpy:

int success = WriteBlock(my_address, (char *) &data_var, sizeof(struct data)

To be clearer and avoid the cast, you may wish to wrap this in a union:

union {
    struct data{
        int num1;
        int num2;
        int num3;
        int num4;
    };
    char data_arr[sizeof(struct data)];
};

This will allow you to call it with a more traditional syntax.

Note that both methods (and memcpy!) could fail if you've got a non-contiguous structure. For instance, perhaps your structure looks like this:

struct data{
 int   num1;
 char  num2;
 long  num3;
 short num4;
}

If you're on anything other than an 8-bit system, such a structure is likely (depending on your architecture) to contain gaps. For example, assuming num1 is 0x12345678, num2 is 0x9A, num3 is 0xBCDEF0123456789A, and num4 is 0xBCDE, you might have any the following (assuming that your memory is zero-initialized, and big-endian for clarity):

    /* 8-bit */
    0x1234 5678 9ABC DEF0 1234 5678 9ABC DE00
    /* 16-bit */
    0x1234 5678 009A BCDE F012 3456 789A BCDE
    /* 32-bit */
    0x1234 5678 0000 0000 0000 009A BCDE F012 3456 789A 0000 0000 0000 BCDE

In this case, you'll have to use something more ugly, like the following function:

int fillDataBuffer(struct data d, char *buffer, int len) 
{
  int i, j = 0;

  for (i = sizeof(d.num1) - 1; i >= 0 && j < len; i--, j++) {
    buffer[j] = (char) (d.num1 >> i); 
  }
  for (i = sizeof(d.num2) - 1; i >= 0 && j < len; i--, j++) {
    buffer[j] = (char) (d.num2 >> i); 
  }
  for (i = sizeof(d.num3) - 1; i >= 0 && j < len; i--, j++) {
    buffer[j] = (char) (d.num3 >> i); 
  }
  for (i = sizeof(d.num4) - 1; i >= 0 && j < len; i--, j++) {
    buffer[j] = (char) (d.num4 >> i); 
  }

  if (j >= len) {
    /* Error!  The buffer wasn't big enough. */
    return 0;
  } else {
    return 1;
  }
}

or the #pragma pack() macro, but that could make computations using the struct slower, and you'd probably rather pack it when you're going to do the buffering.

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Thanks for the name of the problem! I see this all the time, on SO and elsewhere ... thus I said in my answer that I questioned what the OP was really trying to, which led to your answer to the actual requirement. :-) –  Jim Balter Apr 8 '11 at 19:11
    
Would it help to mention that for a direct read of the address range from the flash api, the address range has to be either locked in memory OR the address range is not pageable. –  lsk Jul 13 '13 at 1:44

memcpy can do this

Microsoft systems can use memcpy_s for an automated check on sizes

You also need to be aware of pointers inside struct data.

struct data { 
    int num1;
    char* name;
}

the content of the memory pointed by char* name will not be copied by memcpy. You will need some kind of serialization which is a little more complicated.

Here is some valid code that does it. It copies the data to and from then displays the result

struct data{
  int num1;
  int num2;
  int num3;
};

int main(int argc, char** argv)
{
   data my_data;
   my_data.num1 = 64;
   my_data.num2 = 65;
   my_data.num3 = 66;

   char buffer[20];
   memcpy(buffer, &my_data, sizeof(data));

   data copy_data;
   memcpy(&copy_data, buffer, sizeof(data));

   printf("the numbers : %d - %d - %d \n", copy_data.num1, copy_data.num2, copy_data.mum3);



   return 0;
}
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You need to use &data to get a pointer. –  ughoavgfhw Apr 8 '11 at 0:35
1  
In this case since his destination buffer is probably smaller than the size of the structure memcpy(buffer, var_data, sizeof(buffer)) is probably a better idea. –  Ben Apr 8 '11 at 0:37
    
@ughoavgfhw data is the name of the structure, not of the variable so you don't want &data. –  Ben Apr 8 '11 at 0:38
    
So, memcpy(buffer, &data, sizeof(data)); doesn't work. There is nothing in buffer. –  Punit Apr 8 '11 at 0:48
    
@Ben It would be a grave mistake if the OP's destination buffer were smaller than what is being copied into it, and in fact the question has been edited to fix that. –  Jim Balter Apr 8 '11 at 0:59

First, you need a semicolon after the closing brace. Second you should use typedefs. Third, you should capitalize user types (some people recommend putting _t after your types, but that actually violates the C standard because such names are reserved). Fourth, you need a value of that type to copy. Considering all that:

typedef struct{
 int num1;
 int num2;
 int num3;
 int num4;
} Data;

Data foo = { 1, 2, 3, 4};
char buffer[sizeof foo]; // at least

memcpy(buffer, &foo, sizeof foo);

However, I would question why you actually want to copy a structure to a char buffer. You should state what you're actually trying to achieve, because there's a good chance that there's a better way to go about it.

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1  
I am trying to copy this struct to a flash. And the Flash read/write API passes a string. –  Punit Apr 8 '11 at 1:31
    
@Punit - Then you're solving the wrong problem! You don't really want to copy to a RAM buffer and then to Flash, you want to be able to pass the data in your structure through the string API. I posted some options for doing this in my answer. –  Kevin Vermeer Apr 8 '11 at 5:13

Using memcpy will enable the entire structure to be copied into a buffer. For eg., contents of 'ob1' are copied into 'buffer' in the following code:

 #include <stdio.h>
 #include <stdlib.h>      
 #include <string.h>

    struct data{
        int num1;
        int num2;
        int num3;
        int num4;
    };
    int main()
    {
        struct data ob1;
        struct data *buffer = (struct data *)malloc(sizeof(struct data));
        if(buffer == NULL)
            {
               printf("Memory allocation failed\n");
               return;
            }

        ob1.num1 = 1;
        ob1.num2 = 2;
        ob1.num3 = 3;
        ob1.num4 = 4;

        memcpy(buffer, &ob1, sizeof(struct data));

    }
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I understand how this work, but in case of a char* name component inside the structure data. how do we deal with this? copy to the buffer and then being able to extract the information back from the buffer to a structure.? the buffer I created is a char* buffer not a buffer of the type struct. Thanks –  mmm Apr 12 '13 at 13:28

The answer above will only work if the size of the struct elements are all of the same size (assuming using a 32 bit cpu and compiler). So ints will be 32 bits each but if your struct contains a char for example as well as ints then the compiler is likely to pad out the char to 32 bits for data alignment purposes.

You could try sprintf on each of the elements of the struct and casting each element to the correct size as you load each element into the char buffer.

Or you could just load the buffer element by element using an incrementing the index by the size the correct number of bytes for each element on each write to the buffer. Long winded but arguably more efficient id resources are scarce and data is big.

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