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I've run into an interesting question that, so far, I haven't been able to find a good convincing answer for.

Imagine I have a radio button on a form, the three options are:

  • date of birth
  • number of siblings
  • name

When you implement these as a radio button, you can only specify one of the three.

Now imagine that I actually wanted the value to be specified as well. So my form looked something like this:

  • date of birth: yyyy/mm/dd
  • number of siblings: nn
  • name: xyz

So, if I were to select the radio button 'date of birth', then I'd be able to enter a Datetime as the value, but if I were to select Name, then I'd want a string, and alas, if I wanted to select Number of Siblings, then I'd want an integer as the value.

I don't think this is particularly ground-breaking in form design.

The interesting question is, how the heck do I do this using C# code. Let me explain.

I have a method, and it accepts an object of type "PersonalityTrait". This PersonalityTrait object, however, can only have one of three properties set, either it has a date of birth, or it has a number of siblings or it has a name. It cannot contain 2 or more properties. How the heck do I ensure that it contains only one of three properties??

I thought about leaving this task to any code that uses this object to check if it has more than one property set, but I'm not sure that task should be left to the calling code. It just goes against the DRY (Don't repeat yourself) principle. Plus I don't trust the calling code to be as vigilant.

I thought about creating a method on that PersonalityTrait object that would validate it (by checking that only one property is set), but again, I'm not sure the calling code will call it.

I thought about changing the SET property method code to actually check other properties first and throw an exception if other properties were set already, but that feels like providing a checklist on a form instead of a radio-button and throwing an exception if the user selected more than one option (it's just unintuitive to the user!!).

If this were just a single field, I'd create an Enum and make it one of three options (Birthday, Number of Siblings or Name), but the issue is, I also want to accept a VALUE, and I want that value to be strongly-typed.

This seems like a Jon-Skeet type of question, LOL, I might have to review 'C# in Depth' to figure this one out. But I figured I'd post it on StackOverFlow for now!!

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1  
btw, please don't include "C#" in your title - you've already got it in the tags. – John Saunders Apr 8 '11 at 1:07
    
This sounds like a perfect use for generics. Both of the already posted answers seem to be on the right track. Having 3 separate properties is bad design and you'll end up with overcomplicated code and more opportunities for bugs. – takteek Apr 8 '11 at 1:23

What's missing from this problem is the need to pass the container as a parameter to a method (I know the poster and have discussed this with him).

I like the idea of Generics. I was thinking something like this:

class Program
{
    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        var param = new Container<int>(){ Name = "Age", Value =  60};

        Test(param);

    }

    public static void Test<TType>(Container<TType> container)
    {

        Console.Write(string.Format("{0} = {1}", container.Name, container.Value));
        Console.ReadLine();


    }

}

public class Container<TType>
{
    public string Name { get; set; }
    public TType Value { get; set; }
}

I don't love the magic strings, especially since this is going to end up being a public API exposed through a web service.

share|improve this answer
    
Yes, the need to pass the container as a parameter to a method is definitely part of the problem. – FullOfQuestions Apr 8 '11 at 2:30

Kinda thinking out loud here, so it might not make much sense.

I would have an enum called PersonalityTrait.

enum PersonalityTrait
{
    DateOfBirth,
    NumberOfSiblings,
    Name
}

You could have a generic PersonalityTraitValue<T> class

public class PersonalityTraitValue<T>
{
    public T Value { get; set; }
    public PersonalityTrait Trait { get; set; }
}

The you could have an PersonalityTraitManager or PersonalityTraitFactory class that accepts the enum and returns/sets PersonalityTraitValue<T> instances.

As I said, this isn't probably the greatest idea, but it was the first one that came to mind.

share|improve this answer

Maybe something like:

class DataHolder<T>
{
    private T datacontainer;

    public DataHolder(T input)
    {
        datacontainer = input;
    }
    public DataHolder() {}

    public T Data
    {
        get { return datacontainer; }
        set { datacontainer = value; }
    }
}
share|improve this answer

Perhaps:

class MyDataHolder {
    int numberOfSiblings = -1;
    public property int NumberOfSiblings {
        get {
            ClearData();
            numberOfSiblings = value;
        }
    }

    DateTime dateOfBirth = null;
    public property DateTime DateOfBirth {
        get {
            ClearData();
            dateOfBirth = value;
        }
    }

    String name = null;
    public property String Name {
        get {
            ClearData();
            name = value;
        }
    }


    private void ClearData() {
        numberOfSiblings = -1;
        dateOfBirth = null;
        name = null;
    }


    public object GetData() {
        if (numberOfSiblings != -1) {
            return numberOfSiblings;
        }
        else if (dateOfBirth != null) {
            return dateOfBirth;
        }
        else if (name != null) {
            return name;
        }

        return null;
    }
}
share|improve this answer

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