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I'm working with Python and whenever I've had to validate function input, I assumed that the input worked, and then caught errors.

In my case, I had a universal Vector() class which I used for a few different things, one of which is addition. It functioned both as a Color() class and as a Vector(), so when I add a scalar to the Color(), it should add that constant to each individual component. Vector() and Vector() addition required component-wise addition.

This code is being used for a raytracer so any speed boosts are great.

Here's a simplified version of my Vector() class:

class Vector:
  def __init__(self, x, y, z):
    self.x = x
    self.y = y
    self.z = z

  def __add__(self, other):
    try:
      return Vector(self.x + other.x, self.y + other.y, self.z + other.z)
    except AttributeError:
      return Vector(self.x + other, self.y + other, self.z + other)

I'm currently using the try...except method. Does anybody know of a faster method?


EDIT: Thanks to the answers, I tried and tested the following solution, which checks specifically for a class name before adding the Vector() objects:

class Vector:
  def __init__(self, x, y, z):
    self.x = x
    self.y = y
    self.z = z

  def __add__(self, other):
    if type(self) == type(other):
      return Vector(self.x + other.x, self.y + other.y, self.z + other.z)
    else:
      return Vector(self.x + other, self.y + other, self.z + other)

I ran a speed test with these two blocks of code using timeit, and the results were pretty significant:

 1.0528049469 usec/pass for Try...Except
 0.732456922531 usec/pass for If...Else
 Ratio (first / second): 1.43736090753

I haven't tested the Vector() class with no input validation whatsoever (i.e. moving the checking out of the class and into the actual code), but I'd imagine that it's even faster than the if...else method.


Late update: Looking back at this code, this is not an optimal solution.

OOP makes this even faster:

class Vector:
  def __init__(self, x, y, z):
    self.x = x
    self.y = y
    self.z = z

  def __add__(self, other):
    return Vector(self.x + other.x, self.y + other.y, self.z + other.z)

class Color(Vector):
  def __add__(self, other):
    if type(self) == type(other):
      return Color(self.x + other.x, self.y + other.y, self.z + other.z)
    else:
      return Color(self.x + other, self.y + other, self.z + other)
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1  
Please use timeit and include the real timing results of your two alternatives. –  S.Lott Apr 8 '11 at 1:42
1  
Are you aware that the two examples do different things? It's not clear what you're measuring since they're not comparable. –  S.Lott Apr 8 '11 at 2:35
    
I'll post my code. Don't think that I manually entered in 'a' 1,000,000 times into a Terminal window ;) –  Blender Apr 8 '11 at 2:40
    
Your if validation wouldn't work for negative numbers like '-1' –  razpeitia Apr 8 '11 at 2:59
1  
@Blender: Please focus this question. Your if 'a'.isdigit() is completely irrelevant and confusing. Please remove it. If your "real" problem is your VectorCheck class, then just show that. Also, don't mess around with fancy "line-out" and other markup. SO maintains a complete changelog. Please just focus on one thing. Package up your real question into something others can learn from. –  S.Lott Apr 8 '11 at 10:05
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2 Answers 2

up vote 57 down vote accepted

I upvoted Matt Joiner's answer, but wanted to include some additional observations to make it clear that, along with a couple of other factors, there are 4 times that matter when choosing between pre-checking conditions (known as LBYL or "Look Before You Leap") and just handling exceptions (known as EAFP or "Easier to Ask Forgiveness than Permission").

Those timings are:

  • Timing when the check succeeds with LBYL
  • Timing when the check fails with LBYL
  • Timing when an exception is not thrown with EAFP
  • Timing when an exception is thrown with EAFP

The additional factors are:

  • The typical ratio of check success/failure or exception thrown/not thrown cases
  • Whether or not there is a race condition that prevents the use of LBYL

That last point is the one that needs to be addressed first: if there is a potential for a race condition, then you have no choice, you must use exception handling. A classic example is:

if <dir does not exist>:
    <create dir> # May still fail if another process creates the target dir

Since LBYL doesn't rule out the exception is such cases, it offers no real benefit and there's no judgement call to be made: EAFP is the only approach that will handle the race condition correctly.

But if there's no race condition, either approach is potentially viable. They offer different trade-offs:

  • if no exception is raised, then EAFP is close to free
  • however, it is comparatively expensive if an exception occurs, as there is quite a lot of processing involved in unwinding the stack, creating the exception and comparing it to the exception handling clauses
  • LBYL, by contrast, incurs a potentially high fixed cost: the additional check is always performed, regardless of success or failure

That then leads to the following decision criteria:

  • Is this piece of code known to be critical to the speed of the application? If not, then don't worry about which of the two is faster, worry about which of the two is easier to read.
  • Is the pre-check more expensive than the cost of raising and catching an exception? If yes, then EAFP is always faster and should be used.
  • Things get more interesting if the answer is "no". In that case, which is faster will depend on whether the success or the error case is more common, and the relative speeds of the pre-check and the exception handling. Answering this definitively requires real timing measurements.

As a rough rule of thumb:

  • if there is a potential race condition, use EAFP
  • if speed isn't critical, just use whichever you consider easier to read
  • if the pre-check is expensive, use EAFP
  • if you expect the operation to succeed most of the time*, use EAFP
  • if you expect the operation to fail more than half the time, use LBYL
  • if in doubt, measure it

*People will vary as to what they consider "most of the time" in this context. For me, if I expect the operation to succeed more than half the time, I would just use EAFP as a matter of course, until I had reason to suspect this piece of code was an actual performance bottleneck.

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6  
Wow, this is one of the best SO answers I have ever received! I think that I've been relying too much on the classes to do the heavy lifting repeatedly, since now that I come to think of it, I only perform Vector/Scalar addition only once, so if I were to move all type-checking outside of the class and into the required code areas, I can remove basically all of the class-related latency in my code. –  Blender Apr 8 '11 at 7:36
3  
@Blender: "move all type-checking outside of the class". Universally true. Not just for performance, but for simplicity overall. Classes just do work, they don't validate. –  S.Lott Apr 8 '11 at 10:07
    
Good point. I managed to rid myself of over 100 lines of code just by doing that. –  Blender Apr 8 '11 at 15:52
1  
Good, thorough answer ncoghlan, but in addition I'd say that if performance isn't an issue (which is almost always), then I'd go with whichever leads to the clearest code - and for me, that is usually the explicit type check. I think choosing EAFP for performance reasons is usually premature optimization. –  Jonathan Hartley Dec 10 '11 at 10:27
2  
@Jonathon: I believe his point is that, aside from explicit validation routines, it's often best to follow "Garbage In Garbage Out" rules and just let Python's own exceptions escape if people hand you nonsensical arguments. Python's pretty good about making sure you'll get an exception in such cases instead of silently producing garbage data - it's only in the (relatively rare) latter cases and cases where the errors are otherwise confusing that you need to embed your own validation into operations. –  ncoghlan Dec 13 '11 at 0:31
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In Python, exceptions are often faster due to the reduced number of lookups. However a friend once said (and it should apply to any language), pretend that everytime an exception is caught, there is a small delay. Avoid using exceptions where a delay could be a problem.

In the example you've given, I'd go with the exception.

share|improve this answer
    
I'm working with a raytracer; sometimes I get an output of 0.0, while other times, I get Vector(1, 0, 1.5). I need to know the type, as each case is handled differently. So you recommend me not to try...except? –  Blender Apr 8 '11 at 1:49
    
Well, I changed my try blocks into if blocks, and I got a speed boost by a factor of two! Thanks! –  Blender Apr 8 '11 at 2:22
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