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I was looking at some code that outputs a number to the binary form with prepended 0s.

    byte number = 48;
    int i = 256; //max number * 2
    while( (i >>= 1) > 0) {
        System.out.print(((number & i) != 0 ? "1" : "0"));
    }

and didn't understand what the i >>= 1 does. I know the i >> 1 shifts to the right by 1 bit but didn't understand what the "=" does and AFAIK, it is not possible to do a search for ">>=" to find out what it means.

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A slight improvement would be while((i >>>= 1) != 0) as the current loop would not do anything if you gave it i = 1 << 31 and you could never printout the top bit of a 32-bit number. –  Peter Lawrey Apr 8 '11 at 7:42

1 Answer 1

i >>= 1 is just shorhand for i = i >> 1 in the same way that i += 4 is short for i = i + 4

EDIT: Specifically, those are both examples of compound assignment operators.

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1  
And, specifically, it's a sign-extending shift. –  Lawrence Dol Apr 8 '11 at 3:45
    
Mathematically right shifting a number by 1 is equivalent to the dividing the number by 2. –  yasouser Apr 13 '11 at 19:26

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