Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

Is there any better way of converting a hashtable to datatable

private DataTable ConvertHastTableToDataTable(System.Collections.Hashtable hashtable)
{

   var dataTable = new DataTable(hashtable.GetType().Name);
    dataTable.Columns.Add("Key",typeof(object));
    dataTable.Columns.Add("Value", typeof(object));
    IDictionaryEnumerator enumerator = hashtable.GetEnumerator();
    while (enumerator.MoveNext())
    {
     dataTable.Rows.Add(enumerator.Key, enumerator.Value);

    }
    return dataTable;
}
share|improve this question
up vote 4 down vote accepted

That's a pretty straightforward method of doing it. However, the real idiomatic way in this particular case is to just use the foreach construct directly.

foreach (DictionaryEntry item in hashtable)
{
    // work with item.Key and item.Value here
}

For future programming, you probably want to go ahead and use a Dictionary<TKey, TValue> collection, which allows for stronger typing than the legacy, non-generic Hashtable. Example:

Dictionary<string, double> dictionary = new Dictionary<string, double>();
dictionary.Add("Foo", 1.2);
dictionary.Add("Bar", 2.4);

foreach (KeyValuePair<string, double> pair in dictionary)
{
    // work with pair.Key and pair.Value, each strongly typed
}
share|improve this answer
    
I mostly do not use C#, but I do not understand why your answer is better rated. Maybe you can explain. For example 1) IDictionaryEnumerator does not implement IDisposable interface, so garbage collector can not dispose it. This is automatically called, when using keyword is used - I do not think you can even compile that. 2) foreach (var item in collection) - what is item? ... Compiler does not know, so you need to cast the element 2 times, defeating the purpose of using var. – Margus Apr 8 '11 at 15:46
    
@Margus, you're absolutely right. My answer was written from the perspective of a generic collection, as IEnumerator<T> implements IDisposable. IEnumerator, which is what would be used in legacy collections, does not. Had this been a Dictionary<K, V>, my answer would have been more appropriate. – Anthony Pegram Apr 13 '11 at 5:06

If you add extension to your data type. What can be done with:

//imports
using MMExtensions;

//your namespace

namespace MMExtensions {
    public static class DictionaryExtensions {
        public static DataTable ToDataTable<TKey, TValue>(
            this Dictionary<TKey, TValue> hashtable
        ){
            var dataTable = new DataTable(hashtable.GetType().Name);
            dataTable.Columns.Add("Key", typeof(object));
            dataTable.Columns.Add("Value", typeof(object));
            foreach (KeyValuePair<TKey, TValue> var in hashtable){
                dataTable.Rows.Add(var.Key, var.Value);
            }
            return dataTable;
        }
    }
    public static class HashtableExtensions {
        public static DataTable ToDataTable(this Hashtable hashtable) {
            var dataTable = new DataTable(hashtable.GetType().Name);
            dataTable.Columns.Add("Key", typeof(object));
            dataTable.Columns.Add("Value", typeof(object));

            foreach (DictionaryEntry var in hashtable){
                dataTable.Rows.Add(var.Key, var.Value);
            }
            return dataTable;
        }
    }
}

Then, you can use following to create your table.

DataTable dt = new Dictionary<string, int> {{"v1", 1}, {"v2", 2}}.ToDataTable();
DataTable dt2 = new Hashtable(){{"v1", 1}, {"v2", 2}}.ToDataTable();

Note that I did not change all that much. C# already has hashmap data structure, and it is called dictionary. Also when looping over collections, it is a lot better to use foreach loop, as it uses safer way to loop. You can also use special type var, but rather I think it defeats the purpose here, as you need the type info.

Edit: Included Hashtable extension.

share|improve this answer
    
but it does not serve the purpose... converting from hasttable – learner Apr 8 '11 at 6:36
    
@learner : I disagree, but still included hashtable extension. – Margus Apr 8 '11 at 15:38

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.