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This causes problems due to extra whitespace:

std::string t("3.14 ");
double d = boost::lexical_cast<double> (t); 

So, I wrote this

template<typename T> 
T string_convert(const std::string& given)
{
  T output;
  std::stringstream(given) >> output;
  return output;
}

double d = string_convert<double> (t); 

What can be the problems with this? Is there a better way? Much prefer to use lexical cast

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2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Note that your code isn't always correct. If you do string_convert<double>("a"), for example, the read will fail and you'll return output uninitialized, leading to undefined behavior.

You can do this:

template<typename T> 
T string_convert(const std::string& given)
{
  T output;
  if (!(std::stringstream(given) >> output))
    throw std::invalid_argument(); // check that extraction succeeded

  return output;
}

Note the only difference between the above code and Boost's is that Boost also checks to make sure nothing is left in the stream. What you should do, though, is just trim your string first:

#include <boost/algorithm/string/trim.hpp>

std::string t("3.14 ");
boost::algorithm::trim(t); // get rid of surrounding whitespace

double d = boost::lexical_cast<double>(t); 
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Crucially, the above string_convert template doesn't just conveniently ignore whitespace: if also ignores trailing non-whitespace that may well indicate an invalid value. The trim is definitely more robust, or you can change string_convert ala char c; std::stringstream ss(given); if (!(ss >> output) || (ss >> c)) .... –  Tony D Apr 8 '11 at 5:44
    
If you want a conversion function which ignores trailing whitespace, you should do something like: std::stringstream s(given); if (!(s >> output >> ws) || s.get() != EOF) throw ... –  James Kanze Apr 8 '11 at 9:41

Boost::lexical_cast considers an attempted conversion successful only if the entire input is converted into the output. I.e., it's basically like your string_convert, except that just before return output, it checks whether there's anything left in the stringstream, and if there is, it considers the conversion "failed", and throws an exception.

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