Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I used some code like this:

void A()
{
    typedef struct B B;
    struct B
    {

    };

    B b;
};

typedef and struct definition inside a function. It compiled with Clang, but I want to know (1) whether they are part of standard or not. And about (2) whether they are limited to be recognized in function scope only.

share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 7 down vote accepted

Yes, the standard allows this, and yes, the name you create this way is only visible inside the function (i.e., it has local scope, just like when you define int i;, i has local scope).

It's more common, however to do it something like this:

typedef struct { 
    /* ... */ 
} B;
B b;
share|improve this answer
3  
or, if you're really only going to use it once, struct { /* ... */ } b; :) –  Mac Apr 8 '11 at 5:27

Yes it is allowed. but you cannot have
function inside a function.

declarations should be done first and later on you can do with your actual code.

you cannot declare after you do some operation inside your function like below

void A()
{

int a=0;

a++;    

typedef struct B B;//this is wrong
    struct B
    {

    };

    B b;
};
share|improve this answer
2  
C89 requires that declarations/definitions precede other statements, but C99 does not. –  Jerry Coffin Apr 8 '11 at 5:37

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.