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When testing runtime, I use System.nanotime() in the following way:

startTime = System.nanotime();

// some statements

System.out.println("Runtime: " + (System.nanoTime() - startTime));

Is there a way to reuse this test model for other blocks of code in my programs? In other words, can I create this as a method and pass other methods to it during testing?

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4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Yes, you can, but it's even more complicated than your approach:

time(new Runnable() {
    public void run() {
        System.out.println("statements");
    }
});

static void time(Runnable r) {
    long startTime = System.nanoTime();
    r.run();
    System.out.println("Runtime: " + (System.nanoTime() - startTime));
}

In Java 7, this will get a bit simpler (I left out the 'Measure' implementation):

try (Measure m = new Measure()) {
    System.out.println("statements");
}

By the way, it's better to use System.nanoTime() than System.currentTimeMillis(), not only because the former is more accurate, but also because the later will hickup around summertime change (or other system time changes).

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Interesting use of an ARM block! Note that you should be able to leave out Measure m = if you don't need to access m inside the try block. –  Joachim Sauer Apr 8 '11 at 8:01
    
Sorry, I was reading an old version of the spec, the variable specification seems to be mandatory now. –  Joachim Sauer Apr 8 '11 at 8:07
    
Yes, it's a pity the variable specification is required. –  Thomas Mueller Apr 8 '11 at 8:11
    
I was curious as to why that feature was removed and here's some explanation. –  Joachim Sauer Apr 8 '11 at 8:25

Using AOP is probably your best bet, it will allow you to externally define what methods you want to performance test, and automatically embellish those methods with this timing code, without having to modify the source code.

See http://dhruba.name/2008/12/16/spring-aop-timing-aspect/

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Profiler: I actually prefer running the code through the profiler. I am actually interested in the bottlenecks, and I assume that is what you are after.

Other alternatives do exist.

JUnit and JPerf: If you have junit tests, then using jperf is a piece of cake.

Dynamic Proxy: If you have interfaces in your application and iff you are only interested in the interface calls, create a dynamic proxy and use it for time stamping.

Stop watch object: A simpler approach than yours is to create a Stopwatch object (apache commons has one), with start, pause, resume, lap stop methods and use it. This works better than your code as stop watch instances can be used with callbacks, events and threads.

AOP: Other than profilers almost all the above options can be realized using custom code, but if you have are curious enough to learn AOP, it would be great.

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Three additional answers. First the (relatively) obvious one:

for (long t = start(); end(t);) {
    System.out.println("statement");
}

static long start() {
    return System.nanoTime();
}

static boolean end(long startTime) {
    System.out.println("Runtime: " + (System.nanoTime() - startTime));
    return false;
}

A weird one, with the disadvantage that you get a warning (variable v is never read). I wonder if this could be improved:

for (Void v : time()) {
    System.out.println("statement");
}

static Iterable<Void> time() {
    return new Iterable<Void>() {
        long startTime = System.nanoTime();
        boolean done;
        public Iterator<Void> iterator() {
            return new Iterator<Void>() {
                public boolean hasNext() {
                    if (!done) {
                        done = true;
                        return true;
                    }
                    System.out.println("Runtime: " + (System.nanoTime() - startTime));
                    return false;
                }
                public Void next() {
                    return null;
                }
                public void remove() {
                }
            };
        }
    };
}

And cheating:

while(time()) {
    System.out.println("statement");
}

static boolean stop;
static long startTime;
static boolean time() {
    if (!stop) {
        startTime = System.nanoTime();
    } else {
        System.out.println("Runtime: " + (System.nanoTime() - startTime));
    }
    return stop = !stop;
}
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