Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

To call, for example, a function named makeRequest, I learned you need to do makeRequest();. If you only do makeRequest; it is a reference to the function (I thought). Yet, looking at this code (which worked when I tested it), it calls makeRequest; on the window.onload without the parens.

Can someone explain?

window.onload = makeRequest;
var xhr = false;

function makeRequest() {
    if (window.XMLHttpRequest) {
        xhr = new XMLHttpRequest();
    }
    else {
        if (window.ActiveXObject) {
            try {
                xhr = new ActiveXObject("Microsoft.XMLHTTP");
            }
            catch (e) { }
        }
    }

    if (xhr) {
        xhr.onreadystatechange = showContents;
        xhr.open("GET", "colors.xml", true);
        xhr.send(null);
    }
    else {
        document.getElementById("updateArea").innerHTML = "Sorry, but I couldn't create an XMLHttpRequest";
    }
}

function showContents() {
    if (xhr.readyState == 4) {
        if (xhr.status == 200) {
            var outMsg = xhr.responseText;
        }
        else {
            var outMsg = "There was a problem with the request " + xhr.status;
        }
        document.getElementById("updateArea").innerHTML = outMsg;
    }
}
share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 6 down vote accepted

On this line:

window.onload = makeRequest;

the function makeRequest is not called. You only assign the function pointer to the onload event. When the DOM is loaded the browser automatically calls this event and it it is only at that moment that the function it is pointing to is invoked (which might happen much later but leave you with the impression that the function is called immediately).

share|improve this answer

It's a reference when used on the right-side of an expression. ie

var x = myfunction;

would set x to be a "pointer" to myfunction.

var x = myfunction();

would store the value returned-by-myfunction into x.

share|improve this answer
    
thanks, this is what I was thinking of. –  Leahcim Apr 8 '11 at 6:54

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.