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Consider this code.

public class Class1
{
    public void ThisShouldNotCompileBecauseOrderWasVoilated()
    {
        Call2();
        Call1();
    }

    public void ThisShouldCompileBecauseProperOrderIsPresent()
    {
        Call1();
        Call2();
    }

    private void Call1()
    {
        // some code
    }

    private void Call2()
    {
        // some more code
    }
}

What code (or attribute) should I add in Call1()/Call2() which ensures that compiler complains for 1st method and passes for 2nd method. There will be some rule list which compiler will have to refer if order is not correct. In this example the rule list can say "Call1 Call2", meaning call Call1() before Call2()

This is for C# language for .NET 4.0

Thanks!

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Just curious why you want to do this at compile time? It is easy to construct scenarios involving conditional logic where the the call sequence would be OK at run time, but there would be no way to know at compile time. –  Joel Lee Apr 8 '11 at 7:09
    
I don't think there is any compile-time check for this. Runtime checks should be simple though. –  Stephen Chung Apr 8 '11 at 7:12
1  
If you're trying to protect yourself from external callers, and Call1/Call2 are always called together, then you could expose a single public function (that accepts parameters for calls 1 and 2 and an action delegate) that calls Call1, invokes the delegate (so the caller can run code in between), then calls Call2. Can't think of anything you can do in your example though, where you're dealing with callers within the same class. –  Damien_The_Unbeliever Apr 8 '11 at 7:15
    
It's not that simple. I've a legacy system where Call1, Call2 are already coded and spread around everywhere. Now it's known that if Call2 is ever called, Call1 should never be called after that. So I was thinking if I can leverage compiler to figure this out. –  Ankush Apr 20 '11 at 11:44
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4 Answers

up vote 0 down vote accepted

the compiler can't enforce method call ordering, since in many cases it cannot determine statically what the call order is. For example:

public void whichOrder(boolean b)
{
   if (b) call1();
   if (!b) call2();
   if (b) call2();
   if (!b) call1();
}

If it's necessary that the methods are called in the correct order, you have a few choices:

  • document the call order, so that callers know what to do. This doesn't enforce the order, but at least makes coders aware of it.
  • add state to your object to remember which method was called last, and validate the current called method is allowed next. This enforces the method check at runtime.
  • Use a mock framework (e.g. Moq) to unit test your clients. This checks at build time that the order is correct.

Which approach you choose depends on how critical the correct ordering is, and the consequences of calling the methods in the wrong order.

An alternative is to rework your design so that method ordering doesn't become an issue. For example, wrap both methods up in a third, call3() that invokes call1() and call2() in the correct order. Or perhaps, have call2() invoke call1() if it has not already been executed, and have call1() check if it's already run, and return silently if it doesn't need to run. If clients invoke call2() then call1(), you still internally get the effect of call1() first (from call2()'s internal call to call1()) and the client's call to call1() results in a no op.

E.g.

public void call3()
{
    call1();
    call2();
}

or

public void call2()
{
   call1();
   // rest of call2's logic
}

private boolean call1Called = false;
pubic void call1()
{
   if (!call1Called)
   {
      call1Called=true;
      call1Impl();
   }

}
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I like mock framework idea. Will look into that. –  Ankush Apr 20 '11 at 11:49
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There's nothing within normal C# that you can specify for this.

You may be able to use something like NDepend to detect this, but I'm not sure.

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Yeah it appears so. Will evaluvate other options. Thanks. –  Ankush Apr 20 '11 at 11:51
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You can create your own attribute and mark your methods using it. Then create an FXCop rule. FXCop fully integrates with your build process, and as long as both calls are taking place within the same method, the rule should be fairly easy to flesh out.

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Thanks, will investigate into this. –  Ankush Apr 20 '11 at 11:46
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This is not exactly what you are asking ... but you could introduce another class:

public class Another1
{
    public Another2 Call1()
    {
        // some code
        return new Another2();  
        // could pass 'this' to Another2 constructor so it has all state
    }
}

public class Another2
{
    public void Call2()
    {
        // some more code
    }
}

Now, starting from an instance of Another1 you can only do obj.Call1().Call2() and never obj.Call2().Call1(). Better yet, this enforcement is in the IDE as you type. Take a look at 'fluent' patterns also.

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This won't be possible in my case. Thanks. –  Ankush Apr 20 '11 at 11:49
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