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Currently, I have bunch of triggers that do the same thing. This is copy-pasted for every table that needs this functionality.

delimiter $$

create trigger user_before_insert before insert on user for each row
begin
    set NEW.create_time = CURRENT_TIMESTAMP;
    set NEW.create_user_id = @user_id;
    set NEW.modify_time = CURRENT_TIMESTAMP;
    set NEW.modify_user_id = @user_id;
end$$

create trigger user_before_update before update on user for each row
begin
    set NEW.modify_time = CURRENT_TIMESTAMP;
    set NEW.modify_user_id = @user_id;
end$$

Is it possible to wrap the lines that modify OLD and/or NEW into stored procedures that are called via triggers? Something like this:

delimiter $$

create procedure autofill_on_insert(inout NEW data_type) -- what would be the data_type?
begin
    set NEW.create_time = CURRENT_TIMESTAMP;
    set NEW.create_user_id = @user_id;
    set NEW.modify_time = CURRENT_TIMESTAMP;
    set NEW.modify_user_id = @user_id;
end$$

create procedure autofill_on_update(inout NEW data_type) -- what would be the data_type?
begin
    set NEW.modify_time = CURRENT_TIMESTAMP;
    set NEW.modify_user_id = @user_id;
end$$

delimiter ;

create trigger user_before_insert before insert on user
    for each row call autofill_on_insert(NEW);
create trigger user_before_update before update on user
    for each row call autofill_on_update(NEW);

Additional question: if this is possible, is there any way to check if NEW contains specific columns? There are tables that do not have modify_time and modify_user_id.

share|improve this question
up vote 0 down vote accepted

I can say that NEW cannot be passed into the procedure, because NEW is an alias that represents a row. Procedure's arguments have to be scalar values, like INT, VARCHAR, etc..

About the 'SET NEW.create_time = CURRENT_TIMESTAMP;'; if field create_time is a TIMESTAMP, you could set CURRENT_TIMESTAMP as default value for it.

share|improve this answer
    
I can set current_timestamp as default value for create_time, but it is not enough - the problem is that if I use it for create_time, I can't set it as on update value for modify_time. I also cannot set @user_id as default or on update value for create_user_id and modify_user_id. – binaryLV Apr 8 '11 at 9:25
    
Yes, there only one TIMESTAMP ON UPDATE field must be. But you could add special TIMESTAMP field with ON UPDATE clause (that will be the first TIMESTAMP field); set DEFAULT NULL for modify_time and create_time fields; then (when select modify_time or create_time data) refer to that TIMESTAMP ON UPDATE field if value is null. – Devart Apr 8 '11 at 9:42

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