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I want to save the content of different files to a vector: Vector(0) = Content File1 Vector(1) = Content File2 ...

Later on I need to read out from each index of this vector line by line (getline):

getline(Vector(0), string myString)

As I read on different sites, I can't use vector<istream> myVector.

So how can I solve?

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2  
You should be using vector<string> right? why do you want vector<istream>? –  Naveen Apr 8 '11 at 8:10

4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

It depends on the size of the data you want to manipulate. My two samples has been tested.

You can use a class which handles some raw pointers

#include <iostream>
#include <fstream>
#include <vector>
#include <string>

class file_vector 
{
public:
  file_vector()
  {}

  virtual ~file_vector()
  {
    for( std::vector< std::ifstream* >::iterator it = m_file_streams.begin(); it != m_file_streams.begin(); it++)
    {
      std::ifstream * p_stream = *it;
      delete p_stream;
    }
  }

  void append_file(const std::string& file_name)
  {
    std::ifstream * p_stream = new std::ifstream( file_name.c_str() );
    if(p_stream->is_open())
      m_file_streams.push_back(p_stream);
    else
      delete p_stream;
  }

  void reset()
  {
    for( std::vector< std::ifstream* >::iterator it = m_file_streams.begin(); it != m_file_streams.end(); it++)
    {
      std::ifstream * p_stream = *it;
      p_stream->seekg(0,p_stream->beg);
    }
  }

  size_t size()
  {
    return m_file_streams.size();
  }

  std::ifstream & get(size_t index)
  {
    return * m_file_streams.at(index); // Using at because of index check
  }

  std::ifstream & operator [] (size_t index)
  {
    return get(index);
  }

private:
  std::vector< std::ifstream* > m_file_streams;
};


int main()
{
  file_vector files_content;
  files_content.append_file("file1.txt");
  files_content.append_file("file2.txt");
  files_content.append_file("file3.txt");

  for(size_t i = 0; i < files_content.size(); i++)
  {
    std::string current_line;
    while(std::getline(files_content[i],current_line))
      std::cout << current_line << std::endl;
  }

  files_content.reset(); // To make getline usable again


  return 0;
}

Or a std::vector< std::vector< std::string > >. That's a basic solution for small files but it works.

#include <iostream>
#include <fstream>
#include <vector>
#include <string>

typedef std::vector< std::string > string_vec;
typedef std::vector< std::string >::iterator string_it;

typedef std::vector< string_vec> file_vec;
typedef std::vector< string_vec >::iterator file_it;

int main()
{
  string_vec file_names;
  file_names.push_back("file1.txt");
  file_names.push_back("file2.txt");
  file_names.push_back("file3.txt");

  file_vec files_content;
  string_vec empty_file_content;

  for(string_it file_name = file_names.begin(); file_name != file_names.end(); file_name++)
  {
    std::ifstream input_stream( file_name->c_str() );
    files_content.push_back(empty_file_content);

    if(input_stream.is_open())
    {
      string_vec & current_file_content = files_content[ files_content.size() - 1 ];
      std::string current_line;
      while(std::getline(input_stream, current_line))
        current_file_content.push_back(current_line);
    }
  }

  // Some stuff

    // Reading the content later on
  for(file_it file = files_content.begin(); file != files_content.end(); file++)
  {
    for(string_it line = file->begin(); line != file->end(); line++)
    {
      std::cout << *line << std::endl;
    }
  }

  return 0;
}
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It looks fine, thanks!! –  Christoph Apr 8 '11 at 10:00
1  
be careful, i added a fix in file_vector::append_file (damn these raw pointers ^^) –  JB Jansen Apr 8 '11 at 14:17

iostream cannot be put into any std container.

Maybe you can save them using a void pointer array.

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Hm, could you give me an example :) –  Christoph Apr 8 '11 at 8:19
    
NO. definitely not a void pointer array! –  Nim Apr 8 '11 at 8:22

To be clear, are you wanting to store the file handles and then read from the files later or read the files into a string like container and store these in the vector?

If you're talking about the latter and the files are text files, it should be possible to read them into std::string objects and store them in that form. There's no problem in storing carriage return etc. in a std::string but bear in mind that this solution may not be scaleable: What happens if you need to store a file that's 4Gb+ or 100,000 files in your vector?

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The files are text files, and every file has to be saved into the same vector. Later I need to extract the content from vector(each index) line by line. –  Christoph Apr 8 '11 at 8:36
    
In that case I would read into std::string using getline(), build up the string and save to the vector. –  Component 10 Apr 8 '11 at 16:46

If you want to store a vector of streams, consider using a pointer container or a a vector of smart pointers, something like this:

typedef boost::shared_ptr<std::istream> stream_ptr
std::vector<stream_ptr> stream_container;

// Then add your streams
stream_container.push_back(stream_ptr(new std::ifstream("f1")));
stream_container.push_back(stream_ptr(new std::ifstream("f2")));
stream_container.push_back(stream_ptr(new std::ifstream("f3")));
:

// Then iterate through and call get line..
std::vector<stream_ptr>::iterator it(stream_container.begin()), end(stream_container.end());

std::string sv;
for(; it != end; ++it)
  getline(**it, sv);

This is just example code - untested.

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