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I have a code to get list of prime numbers:

def primes_numbers num
    primes = [2]

    3.step(Math.sqrt(num) + 1, 2) do |i|
        is_prime = true     

        primes.each do |p|   # (here)
            if (p > Math.sqrt(i) + 1)
                break
            end

            if (i % p == 0)
                is_prime = false
                break
            end
        end

        if is_prime
            primes << i
        end     
    end

    primes
end

Is it possible rewrite code using Array methods (select, collect and so on...)? Something like:

s = (3..n)
s.select { |x| x % 2 == 1}.select{ |x| ..... }

The problem is that I need to iterate throught result array (comment 'here') in the select method.

share|improve this question
    
(0..47).select{|n| !('1'*n =~ /^1$|^(11+?)\1+$/)} # Sorry, mate! :) –  Jonas Elfström Apr 8 '11 at 8:56
    
I didn't "invent" that, Abigail did. alicebobandmallory.com/articles/2007/03/30/… –  Jonas Elfström Apr 8 '11 at 9:00
    
@Jonas: I like that one too. Related to that you might want to read "The Prime That Wasn't" zmievski.org/2010/08/the-prime-that-wasnt, which explains why this regex eventually starts reporting false positives. –  Michael Kohl Apr 8 '11 at 9:09
    
In Ruby, indentation is usually two spaces. –  Andrew Grimm Apr 10 '11 at 22:54

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Ruby 1.9 has a very nice Prime class:

http://www.ruby-doc.org/core-1.9/classes/Prime.html

But I'm assuming you don't care about any standard classes, but want to see some code, so here we go:

>> n = 100 #=> 100
>> s = (2..n) #=> 2..100
>> s.select { |num| (2..Math.sqrt(num)).none? { |d| (num % d).zero? }} 
#=> [2, 3, 5, 7, 11, 13, 17, 19, 23, 29, 31, 37, 41, 43, 47, 53, 59, 61, 67, 71, 73, 79, 83, 89, 97]

Note: I wrote it this way because you wanted Enumerable methods, for efficiency's sake you probably want to read up on prime finding methods.

share|improve this answer
    
2 is a prime number. –  Jonas Elfström Apr 8 '11 at 9:14
    
@Jonas: True enough, I copied the range from OP's post without paying attention (he pre-initalized the primes array with [2]). I'll update, thanks. –  Michael Kohl Apr 8 '11 at 9:18

Features : Check a number is Prime, get a number factors and get list of prime numbers and also you can easily transform it in any language you want

As Ruby has its own Prime class so you don't need to worry

but if you want to do it your own without using ruby core things

n=100 #=> a

def prime_numbers(n)
  prime_numbers = []
  (1..n).each do |number|
      prime_numbers << number if is_prime(number)
  end
  prime_numbers
end

def is_prime(n)
   if factors(n).count > 2
      return true
   end
   return false
end

# find factors of a number

def factors(n)
     factors = []
     (1..n).each {|d| factors << d if (n%d).zero?}
     factors
end

Note: There are three functions involved and I deliberately do this for beginners, So that they can easily understand about it

Optimization Guide:

1) You can start loop from 2 and end at n-1 if you want to save iterations

2) use Ruby core functions and enjoy things :)

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