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I'm choosing between the following 2 designs. Which would you recommend and why?

I'm quite doubtful about placing get/set methods in interfaces in the second method. Any comments about this?

public class Foo {
    Time time;
    boolean hasTime();
    Time getTime() { return time; }
    void setTime() { this.time = time; }
}

public class Bar extends Foo {
    boolean hasTime() { return true; }
}

public class Baz extends Foo {
    boolean hasTime() { return false; }
}


main() {
    for (Foo foo : foos) {
        if (foo.hasTime()) {
            // do something
        }
    }
}

vs

public class Foo {
}

public class Bar extends Foo implements TimedObject {
    Time time;
    Time getTime() { return time; }
    void setTime() { this.time = time; }
}

public interface TimedObject {
    Time getTime();
    void setTime();
}

main() {
    for (Foo foo : foos) {
        if (foo instance of TimedObject) {
            // do something
        }
    }
}
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4 Answers

up vote 4 down vote accepted

The second approach is definitely the better.

In the first approach, the getters and setters exist in both Bar and Baz classes, and can be called ... irrespective of what hasTime() returns!

You could override the getter and setter in Baz so that they threw (for instance) an OperationNotSupported exception. But even that's a bit "icky":

  • If you compare how a program would use the two versions, the first one requires you to remember to call hasTime(), whereas with the second one the compiler will tell you if you forget to typecast to a type that is assignment compatible with TimedObject.

  • The first version violates the substitutability principle because Baz would behave in a way that is incompatible with its superclass Foo.

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If the superclass documentation specifies that setTime() will set the time of any object whose hasTime() has ever returned true, then an object could satisfy that contract, even if it couldn't do anything useful in setTime, by having its hasTime() method always return false. No LSP violation. The question is whether one is apt to have collections which contain some things where hasTime() would yield true, and others where it would yield false, and would want to use time-related methods on the ones where it returned true. If one would would want to do that... –  supercat Jan 6 at 20:30
    
...then the hasTime() approach may be cleaner. One might in some cases be able to get "best of both worlds" by using the hasTime approach but defining a FooWithTime class which inherits from Foo and overrides hasTime() to return true. That would allow things in mixed collections to be used efficiently in many cases without typecasts, while allowing for type-based validation of things' support for "time" functions in cases where that was helpful (casts would be required before passing things that might support those methods to things that require them). –  supercat Jan 6 at 20:34
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I prefer second one, as interfaces implemented give you a type regardless the actual object type and guarantees a series of methods available (the "contract" defined by the interface).

In general, don't put boolean hasXX() method for properties accesed bygetters, as normally you should test if (Y.getX() != null) to test if the property is set or has any value.

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I like the second option too. Moreover, if you are doubt with getters and setter in interfaces, you can always consider to split this one interface into two:

public interface TimedObject {
   Time getTime();
}
public interface MutableTimedObject extends TimedObject {
   void setTime(Time time);
}
...
if (foo instance of TimedObject) {
        // do something
        if (foo instance of MutableTimedObject) {
                // change time
        }
}
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Thanks, this is a neat trick. –  David Oliver Apr 8 '11 at 8:57
    
+1 for the neat trick... though an even better idea is to ban mutability altogether! –  mikera Mar 23 '12 at 2:41
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It really depends if you ask me. The pro. with interface is that you will be able to move that code into another class and apply composition instead of inheritance.

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What's the pro of the first approach? –  Ishtar Apr 8 '11 at 8:46
    
The pro. for the first approach is that you can apply real polymorphism. Eg. forcing subclass implementation with abstract etc. Default implementation. –  Marcus Apr 8 '11 at 8:48
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