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I cannot figure out the difference between require() and library() when loading a package in R.

Does someone have a hint for me?

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Ironically, this is the page that came up when I googled difference between library and require, not the r help pg ! –  aginensky Apr 16 at 2:24

5 Answers 5

up vote 93 down vote accepted

There's not much of one in everyday work.

However, according to the documentation for both functions (accessed by putting a ? before the function name and hitting enter), require is used inside functions, as it outputs a warning and continues if the package is not found, whereas library will throw an error.

HTH.

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#richiemorrisroe: Thank you. Does it mean that if I load the packages I need at the very beginning of my R-code it does not matter which one I choose? –  Marco Apr 8 '11 at 13:20
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as long as you are not loading packages inside a function, it really makes no difference. I load all my packages using require, and didnt know what the difference was until i read the help after seeing your question. –  richiemorrisroe Apr 8 '11 at 13:43
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The other reason I use require is that it keeps me from referring to packages as libraries, a practice that drives the R-cognoscenti up the wall. The library is the directory location where the packages sit. –  BondedDust Apr 8 '11 at 15:53
    
Very good! Thank you –  Marco Apr 8 '11 at 17:57
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How funny, require is a stronger word, it implies that you 'must need' something, it should be the one that throws the error, not the other way around.... –  Nicholas Hamilton Apr 23 '13 at 11:26

Another benifit of require() is that it returns a logical value by default. TRUE if the packages is loaded, FALSE if it isn't.

> test <- library("abc")
Error in library("abc") : there is no package called 'abc'
> test
Error: object 'test' not found
> test <- require("abc")
Loading required package: abc
Warning message:
In library(package, lib.loc = lib.loc, character.only = TRUE, logical.return = TRUE,  :
  there is no package called 'abc'
> test
[1] FALSE

So you can use require() in constructions like the one below. Which mainly handy if you want to distribute your code to our R installation were packages might not be installed.

if(require("lme4")){
    print("lme4 is loaded correctly")
} else {
    print("trying to install lme4")
    install.packages("lme4")
    if(require(lme4)){
        print("lme4 installed and loaded")
    } else {
        stop("could not install lme4")
    }
}
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Thank you for the additional answer! –  Marco Apr 9 '11 at 10:30

My initial theory about the difference was that library loads the packages whether it is already loaded or not, i.e. it might reload an already loaded package, while require just checks that it is loaded, or loads it if it isn't (thus the use in functions that rely on a certain package). The documentation refutes this, however, and explicitly states that neither function will reload an already loaded package.

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this is interesting, but isn't really an answer to the question ... ? –  Ben Bolker May 8 at 18:06
?library

and you will see:

library(package) and require(package) both load the package with name package and put it on the search list. require is designed for use inside other functions; it returns FALSE and gives a warning (rather than an error as library() does by default) if the package does not exist. Both functions check and update the list of currently loaded packages and do not reload a package which is already loaded. (If you want to reload such a package, call detach(unload = TRUE) or unloadNamespace first.) If you want to load a package without putting it on the search list, use requireNamespace.

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You can use require() if you want to install packages if and only if necessary, such as:

if (!(require(package, character.only=T, quietly=T))) {
    install.packages(package)
    library(package, character.only=T)
}
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