Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Say I have a simple array:

double[] myDoubleArray = new double[] { 0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 };

Is this as performant:

double last = myDoubleArray.Last();

as this?

double last = myDoubleArray[myDoubleArray.Length - 1];

Will Last() enumerate over the entire array even when it can make the above optimization?

If I passed some other IEnumerable (say one that was yielded), Last() would have to enumerate the sequence. I prefer using Last(), because code looks cleaner, but I would not make a sacrifice if it enumerates the sequence.

share|improve this question
add comment

2 Answers

up vote 20 down vote accepted

No, it won't iterate all over elements. Here's the code of Enumerable.Last() from reflector. As you see, it makes such optimization

public static TSource Last<TSource>(this IEnumerable<TSource> source)
{
    if (source == null)
    {
        throw Error.ArgumentNull("source");
    }
    IList<TSource> list = source as IList<TSource>;
    if (list != null)
    {
        int count = list.Count;
        if (count > 0)
        {
            return list[count - 1];
        }
    }
    else
    {
        using (IEnumerator<TSource> enumerator = source.GetEnumerator())
        {
            if (enumerator.MoveNext())
            {
                TSource current;
                do
                {
                    current = enumerator.Current;
                }
                while (enumerator.MoveNext());
                return current;
            }
        }
    }
    throw Error.NoElements();
}
share|improve this answer
    
Very nice to know, thanks. You can be the answer in 9 minutes... –  jonathanpeppers Apr 8 '11 at 13:36
add comment

No, Last without a predicate optimizes for the IList<T> case, including single-dimensional arrays.

With a predicate, it doesn't perform the optimization. In particular, it doesn't work backwards from the end (which could alter the results due to exceptions).

It's still going to be slightly faster to access the last element directly, but Last() is more readable and will only be "constant time" different - it won't change an O(1) operation to O(N) in this case.

For more about Last, see my Edulinq blog post about it.

Note that the optimization is not documented, so arguably you shouldn't rely on it. In practice, I can't imagine it changing to become O(N) :)

share|improve this answer
1  
Ok, I believe that (I can see the performance effect, and I can see it in the source). But this is not documented, though (unfortunately, as you pointed out many times before, the documentation around the standard LINQ operators is seriously lacking) –  R. Martinho Fernandes Apr 8 '11 at 13:36
    
Its a little disappointing that the one with the predicate doesn't try to enumerate in reverse for IList<T>... –  Justin Apr 8 '11 at 13:37
1  
@Martinho: Yes, I was just adding the documentation bit. –  Jon Skeet Apr 8 '11 at 13:38
1  
@Kragen: I can see both sides of it to be honest. The optimization in LINQ to Objects generally treads a fine line. –  Jon Skeet Apr 8 '11 at 13:38
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.