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I often use Crockford's prototypal pattern when writing JavaScript programs. I thought I understood all the "gotchas" involved, but I discovered one I didn't think about before. I'd like to know if anyone has a best practice for handling it.

Here's a simple example:

// Here's the parent object
var MyObject = {
    registry: {},
    flatAttribute: null,
    create: function () {
        var o, F = function () {};

        F.prototype = this;
        o = new F();
        return o;
    }
};

// instance is an empty object that inherits
// from MyObject
var instance = MyObject.create();

// Attributes can be set on instance without modifying MyObject
instance.flatAttribute = "This is going to be applied to the instance";

// registry doesn't exist on instance, but it exists on
// instance.prototype. MyObject's registry attribute gets
// dug up the prototype chain and altered. It's not possible
// to tell that's happening just by examining this line.
instance.registry.newAttribute = "This is going to be applied to the prototype";

// Inspecting the parent object
// prints "null"
console.log(MyObject.flatAttribute);
// prints "This is going to be applied to the prototype"
console.log(MyObject.registry.newAttribute);

I want to feel safe that any changes that appear to be made to the instance don't propagate up the inheritance change. This is not the case when the attribute is an object and I'm setting a nested property.

A solution is to re-initialize all object attributes on the instance. However, one of the stated advantages of using this pattern is removing re-initialization code from the constructor. I'm thinking about cloning all the object attributes of the parent and setting them on the instance within the create() function:

{ create: function () {
    var o, a, F = function () {};

    F.prototype = this;
    o = new F();
    for (a in this) {
        if (this.hasOwnProperty(a) && typeof this[a] === 'object') {
            // obviously deepclone would need to be implemented
            o[a] = deepclone(this[a]);
        }
    }
    return o;
} };

Is there a better way?

share|improve this question
    
I'm confused - what do you want to happen? what do you want the fields in MyObject to do? –  Claudiu Apr 8 '11 at 14:13
    
@Claudiu I want to feel safe about setting attributes on the instance without having them alter objects further down the inheritance chain. This doesn't necessarily happen if the attribute is an object and I'm setting a nested property. –  EMI Apr 8 '11 at 14:26
    
the code makes it look like you expect registry to be an attribute of instance - else why would you expect it to be there as an object without setting it beforehand? if you want it as an instance attribute then you have to set it manually in the constructor. your code was unsurprising when i read it since i assumed you wanted to set the parent object's field –  Claudiu Apr 8 '11 at 14:41
    
the simple answer is that you are not supposed to store nested object data on the prototype if you don't want it to be static. That data on the prototype is shared and is meant to be shared. If you want something private to an instance then do not store it on the prototype. –  Raynos Apr 8 '11 at 17:34
1  
@Claudiu and @Raynos: you're both definitely right, I'm expecting it to magically initialize instance variables and that's not going to happen. I'm confusing the paradigm. –  EMI Apr 8 '11 at 18:49

4 Answers 4

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Will this give you the expected result? Here I am not using an Object literal, but an instantly instantiated constructor function for the parent object (Base):

var Base = ( function(){
     function MyObject(){
     this.registry = {},
     this.flatAttribute = null;
     if (!MyObject.prototype.create)   
      MyObject.prototype.create = function(){
       return new this.constructor();
      };
     }
     return new MyObject;
    } )(),
// create 2 instances from Base
instance1 = Base.create(),
instance2 = Base.create();

// assign a property to instance1.registry
instance1.registry.something = 'blabla';

// do the instance properties really belong to the instance?
console.log(instance1.registry.something); //=>  'blabla'
console.log(instance2.registry.something === undefined); //=>  true

But it's all a bit virtual. If you don't want to use the new operator (I think that was te whole idea of it), the following offers you a way to do that without the need for a create method :

function Base2(){
     if (!(this instanceof Base2)){
         return new Base2;
     }
     this.registry = {}, 
     this.flatAttribute = null;
     if (!Base2.prototype.someMethod){
         var proto = Base2.prototype;
         proto.someMethod = function(){};
         //...etc
     }
}
//now the following does the same as before:
var  instance1 = Base2(),
     instance2 = Base2();

// assign a property to instance1.registry
instance1.registry.something = 'blabla';

// do the instance properties really belong to the instance?
console.log(instance1.registry.something); //=>  'blabla'
console.log(instance2.registry.something === undefined); //=>  true

Example in a jsfiddle

share|improve this answer
    
All the answers have been good, this one was the first, plus the second example here gave me a new way to think about the pattern, accepting. –  EMI Apr 8 '11 at 19:03
    
This is complete rubbish. Have you looked at the prototype chain of your instances in the first example? And never use new for IEFE-constructs! The second example is better, but move that prototype initalisation stuff out of the constructor function! –  Bergi May 5 '13 at 18:28
    
@Bergi: The code could be better I admit (edited the answer and fiddle) but complete rubbish wouldn't be my judgement. Any arguments for not having prototype initialization within the constructor? And what would be your alternative? –  KooiInc May 6 '13 at 8:26
    
The code would be much clearer, little faster and you don't need the protoInPlace flag (or other conditions). Also it's logically wrong to have prototype methods in the constructor closure. You just might use Base = (function(){ function MyObject(){this.registry={},this.flatAttribute=null;} return {create:function(){ return new MyObject; }}; }());, but I favor FireCrow's answer. –  Bergi May 6 '13 at 9:41

There is a very simple solution to ensuring that they are instance variables only, which is to use the this keyword in the constructor.

var MyObject = {
    flatAttribute: null,
    create: function () {
        var o, F = function () {
           this.registry  = {}
        };

        F.prototype = this;
        o = new F();
        return o;
   }
};

this ensures that all properties of "instance.registry.*" are local to the instance because the lookup order for javascript opjects is as follows.

object -> prototype -> parent prototype ...

so by adding a variable to the instance in the constructor function named "registry" that will always be found first.

another solution, which I think is more elegant is to not use crockford's (java style) constructors and use a layout that reflects javascripts object system more naturally. most of those gotchas are from the misfit between practice and language.

// instance stuff
var F = function () {
   this.registry  = {}
};

F.prototype = {
    // static attributes here
    flatAttribute: null,
    methodA: function(){ 
        // code here 'this' is instance object
        this.att = 'blah';
    }
};

var instanceA = new F();
instanceA.registry['A'] = 'hi';
var instanceB = new F();
instanceB.registry['B'] = 'hello';

instanceA.registry.A == 'hi'; // true
instanceB.registry.B == 'hello'; // true
F.prototype.registry == undefined; // true
share|improve this answer

I always like to keep in mind that object.Create is one option, and not the only way of achieving non-classical inheritance in javascript.

For myself, I always find that Object.create works best when I want to inherit elements from the parent objects prototype chain (i.e. methods that I'd like to be able to apply to the inheriting object).

--

For simple "Own Property" inheritance, Object.create is largely unnecessary. When I want to inherit own properties, i prefer to use the popular Mixin & Extend patterns (which simply copy one object's own properties to another, without worrying about prototype or "new").

In the Stoyan Stefanov book "Javascript Patterns" he gives an example of a deep extend function that does what you're looking for recursively, and includes support for properties that are arrays as well as standard key/value objects:

function extendDeep(parent, child){
    var i,
        toStr = Object.prototype.toString,
        astr = "[object Array]";

    child = child || {};

    for (i in parent) {
        if (parent.hasOwnProperty(i)) {
            if (typeof parent[i] === "object") {
                child[i] = (toStr.call(parent[i]) === astr) ? [] : {};
                extendDeep(parent[i], child[i]);
            } else { 
                child[i] = parent[i];
            }
        }
    }
    return child;
}

If you're using jQuery, jQuery.extend() has an optional "deep" argument that lets you extend an object in near-identical fashion.

share|improve this answer

i think you're using prototypal inheritance to simulate a classic, Object Oriented inheritance.

What are you trying to do is to stop the prototype method lookup which limits its expressiveness, so why using it? You can achieve the same effect by using this functional pattern:

var MyObject = function() {
    // Declare here shared vars
    var global = "All instances shares me!";

    return {
        'create': function() {
            var flatAttribute;
            var register = {};

            return {
                // Declare here public getters/setters
                'register': (function() {
                    return register;
                })(),
                'flatAttribute': (function() {
                    return flatAttribute;
                })(),
                'global': (function() {
                    return global;
                })()
            };
        }
    };
}();


var instance1 = MyObject.create();
var instance2 = MyObject.create();

instance1.register.newAttr = "This is local to instance1";
instance2.register.newAttr = "This is local to instance2";
// Print local (instance) var
console.log(instance1.register.newAttr);
console.log(instance2.register.newAttr);
// Print global var
console.log(instance1.global);
console.log(instance2.global);

Code on jsFiddle

share|improve this answer
    
Um, what are all these useless IEFEs for? And why do you call them "getters/setters"? –  Bergi May 6 '13 at 9:32
    
wrong use of IEFE in getters. will just set a static value. –  oligofren Nov 15 '13 at 11:31

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