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I have a method for searching which looks like this:

public IEnumerable<Result> Search(string searchText)
{

     return _context.Person.Where(x => x.Contains(searchText));
}

I want to be able to call this function with searchText being null/empty and get all of the records back.

I have tried this with no luck:

return _context.Person.Where(x => x.Contains(searchText ?? ""));

is there another way to accomplish this besides breaking it up into two steps and checking searchString in an if statement before applying it to the query?

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related (but not your specific problem here): stackoverflow.com/questions/682429/… –  BlueRaja - Danny Pflughoeft Apr 8 '11 at 14:33
    
Is Contains a method of your Person class? Which searches for FirstName and LastName and so on? How did you even get the original version _context.Person.Where(x => x.Contains(searchText)) working with LINQ to Entities? Can you show this method? –  Slauma Apr 8 '11 at 16:45
    
    
I see, but the examples there are quite other types of queries than your case. In the link are queries like Where(x => x.City.Contains(searchText)) which is the Contains method of a string (the EF provider can map that to SQL statements) and not a user defined method Contains on your Person class like you seem to have. (x in your code above is a Person and not a string.) –  Slauma Apr 8 '11 at 17:23
    
oh im sorry, i changed my code around for a quick example..mine is more like _context.Person.Where(x => x.LastName.Contains(searchText)) –  stephen776 Apr 8 '11 at 18:26

6 Answers 6

up vote 4 down vote accepted
public IEnumerable<Result> Search(string searchText)
{
    if(string.IsNullOrEmpty(searchText))
        return _context.Person;
    else
        return _context.Person.Where(x => x.Contains(searchText));
}
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Assuming that Person is a class Contains seems to be method of this class. An expression like Where(x => x.Contains(searchText)) or Where(x => string.IsNullOrEmpty(searchText) || x.Contains(searchText)) where x is a Person won't work at all with LINQ to Entities, even with a simple class like ...

public class Person
{
    public int Id { get; set; }
    public string Name { get; set; }

    public bool Contains(string searchText)
    {
        return Name.Contains(searchText);
    }
}

... it will throw an exception because LINQ to Entities can't translate this method to a storage expression. Where(x => string.IsNullOrEmpty(searchText) || x.Name.Contains(searchText)) would work though.

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return _context.Person.Where(x =>string.IsNullOrEmpty(searchText) ? true : x.Contains(searchText));

or

public IEnumerable<Result> Search(string searchText)
    {
        return string.IsNullOrEmpty(searchText) ? _context.Person : _context.Person.Where(x => x.Contains(searchText));
    }
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And a less efficient way... Not sure if this is semantically correct but you get the idea...

return _context.Person.Where((x, index) => x.Contains(searchText ?? x[index]));
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You can do it like this:

return _context.Person.Where(x => 
   string.IsNullOrEmpty(searchText) || 
   x.Contains(searchText)
);

This is a pattern I use a lot when I have parameters I want to apply only if they are set.

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_context.Person.Where(x => string.IsNullOrEmpty(searchText) ? true : x.Contains(searchText));
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