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I need to stream a file which will result in save as prompt in the browser. The issue is, the directory that the file is located is virtually mapped, so I am unable to use Server.MapPath to determine it's actual location. The directory is not in the same location (or even phyical server on the live boxes) as the website.

I'd like something like the following, but that will allow me to pass a web URL, and not a server file path.

I may have to end up building my file path from a config base path, and then append on the rest of the path, but hopefully I can do it this way instead.

var filePath = Server.MapPath(DOCUMENT_PATH);

if (!File.Exists(filePath))
    return;

var fileInfo = new System.IO.FileInfo(filePath);
Response.ContentType = "application/octet-stream";
Response.AddHeader("Content-Disposition", String.Format("attachment;filename=\"{0}\"", filePath));
Response.AddHeader("Content-Length", fileInfo.Length.ToString());
Response.WriteFile(filePath);
Response.End();
share|improve this question
    
Can you elaborate a bit on what you mean with "virtually mapped"? A virtual IIS folder accessible by URLs? –  Dag Apr 8 '11 at 15:08
    
It's using a VPP path, which is a concept use by EpiServer CMS We setup the virtual path name (i.e. "/documents/"), and then specify what physical path this should map too (i.e "//servername/documents"). The system then creates this reference to the directory at runtime. You can browse to the files via the web URL without issue –  mp3duck Apr 8 '11 at 15:46
    
The filename is indeed accessibile via URL. I need to use this URL to stream the file, and not the server path, as I am unable to dertmine this from the URL (using MapPath) –  mp3duck Apr 8 '11 at 15:48
    
If you know the URL and the file extension opens the save as prompt in the browser (or is this one of your problems?), perhaps you could redirect the request to the file you want downloaded? Otherwise, user97970's suggestion seems to be the way to go. –  Dag Apr 10 '11 at 16:01

2 Answers 2

up vote 42 down vote accepted

You could use HttpWebRequest to get the file and stream it back to the client. This allows you to get the file with a url. An example of this that I found ( but can't remember where to give credit ) is

    //Create a stream for the file
    Stream stream = null;

    //This controls how many bytes to read at a time and send to the client
    int bytesToRead = 10000;

    // Buffer to read bytes in chunk size specified above
    byte[] buffer = new Byte[bytesToRead];

    // The number of bytes read
    try
    {
      //Create a WebRequest to get the file
      HttpWebRequest fileReq = (HttpWebRequest) HttpWebRequest.Create(url);

      //Create a response for this request
      HttpWebResponse fileResp = (HttpWebResponse) fileReq.GetResponse();

      if (fileReq.ContentLength > 0)
        fileResp.ContentLength = fileReq.ContentLength;

        //Get the Stream returned from the response
        stream = fileResp.GetResponseStream();

        // prepare the response to the client. resp is the client Response
        var resp = HttpContext.Current.Response;

        //Indicate the type of data being sent
        resp.ContentType = "application/octet-stream";

        //Name the file 
        resp.AddHeader("Content-Disposition", "attachment; filename=\"" + fileName + "\"");
        resp.AddHeader("Content-Length", fileResp.ContentLength.ToString());

        int length;
        do
        {
            // Verify that the client is connected.
            if (resp.IsClientConnected)
            {
                // Read data into the buffer.
                length = stream.Read(buffer, 0, bytesToRead);

                // and write it out to the response's output stream
                resp.OutputStream.Write(buffer, 0, length);

                // Flush the data
                resp.Flush();

                //Clear the buffer
                buffer = new Byte[bytesToRead];
            }
            else
            {
                // cancel the download if client has disconnected
                length = -1;
            }
        } while (length > 0); //Repeat until no data is read
    }
    finally
    {
        if (stream != null)
        {
            //Close the input stream
            stream.Close();
        }
    }
share|improve this answer
    
Flushing the response and re-creating the buffer each run is unnecessary - it will just slow down the transfer. Also, I think you should rename some of the variables (fileReq -> urlRequest, fileResp -> urlResponse). Also there is no reason to create the Stream variable, in the beginning, you should create it where you use it (near the GetResponseStream() call) –  data May 11 '12 at 11:06
    
@data_smith Why don't you try what you are suggesting? It won't compile. And the purpose of the buffer is to keep memory usage down on the web server. –  Blam Jun 9 '12 at 20:53
1  
resp is not defined in this example: the code doesn't compile. –  Case Jun 26 '12 at 21:47
    
As @Sharon mentioned, this code doesn't compile. What you need to do is, at the comment that reads // prepare the response to the client. resp is the client Response, add this bit of code: var resp = HttpContext.Current.Response; –  Jeremy Wiggins Jul 2 '12 at 18:11
    
@Dallas Thank you for that sample, it just made my day. I'm using it while building a service that is streaming mp3 files to a Windows Phone 7 client where the AudioPlayerAgent is not able to deal with redirect 302 and then needs to get back the file stream directly. –  Jonx Jul 5 '12 at 11:57

You could try using the DirectoryEntry class with the IIS path prefix:

using(DirectoryEntry de = new DirectoryEntry("IIS://Localhost/w3svc/1/root" + DOCUMENT_PATH))
{
    filePath = de.Properties["Path"].Value;
}

if (!File.Exists(filePath))
        return;

var fileInfo = new System.IO.FileInfo(filePath);
Response.ContentType = "application/octet-stream";
Response.AddHeader("Content-Disposition", String.Format("attachment;filename=\"{0}\"", filePath));
Response.AddHeader("Content-Length", fileInfo.Length.ToString());
Response.WriteFile(filePath);
Response.End();
share|improve this answer

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