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I want to read line by line from a file in C or C++, and I know how to do that when I assume some fixed size of a line, but is there a simple way to somehow calculate or get the exact size needed for a line or all lines in file? (Reading word by word until newline is also good for me if anyone can do it that way.)

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Use getline –  DumbCoder Apr 8 '11 at 15:45
4  
C and C++ are completely different languages, yielding completely different solutions. –  Marlon Apr 8 '11 at 15:58
4  
I love the smell of home work in the morning –  pcantin Apr 8 '11 at 16:17
    
The fundamental issue is that a text line is a variable length record. It is terminated by a newline. Since no size is supplied before the text starts, it cannot be input by reading a fixed number of characters. It must be read character by character until the termination character is found. Thus becomes the basis for buffer overruns (not knowing how much memory to preallocate). –  Thomas Matthews Apr 8 '11 at 20:27

7 Answers 7

If you use a streamed reader, all this will be hidden from you. See getline. The example below is based from the code here.

// getline with strings
#include <iostream>
#include <fstream>
#include <string>
using namespace std;

int main () {
  string str;
  ifstream ifs("data.txt");
  getline (ifs,str);
  cout << "first line of the file is " << str << ".\n";
}
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3  
Get information from a file is what OP is asking for. –  Mahesh Apr 8 '11 at 15:47
2  
cin can perfectly well be replaced by a file stream; cin could be redirected from a file anyway. –  Jonathan Leffler Apr 8 '11 at 15:55

In C, if you have POSIX 2008 libraries (more recent versions of Linux, for example), you can use the POSIX getline() function. If you don't have the function in your libraries, you can implement it easily enough, which is probably better than inventing your own interface to do the job.

In C++, you can use std::getline().

Even though the two functions have the same basic name, the calling conventions and semantics are quite different (because the languages C and C++ are quite different) - except that they both read a line of data from a file stream, of course.

There isn't an easy way to tell how big the longest line in a file is - except by reading the whole file to find out, which is kind of wasteful.

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I would use an IFStream and use getline to read from a file.

http://www.cplusplus.com/doc/tutorial/files/

int main () {
    string line;
    ifstream myfile ("example.txt");
    if (myfile.is_open())
    {
        while ( myfile.good() )
        {
            getline (myfile,line);
            cout << line << endl;
        }
        myfile.close();
    }
    else cout << "Unable to open file"; 

    return 0;
}
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3  
Problem with that is that the file state can be set bad by the attempt to getline, so you want to check it before relying on the line variable's content. For example, the stream's EOF flag isn't set until a read is attempted at end-of-file. I recommend while (getline(stream, line)) { ... } then you can check the reason for termination outside the loop if you care.... –  Tony D Apr 8 '11 at 17:03
    
OP, indicated C OR C++. My answer was in C++, so it answers the question. @Tony, I would agree with you on that. –  Stealth Rabbi Apr 8 '11 at 21:47

You can't get the length of line until after you read it in. You can, however, read into a buffer repeatedly until you reach the end of line.

For programming in c, try using fgets to read in a line of code. It will read n characters or stop if it encounters a newline. You can read in a small buffer of size n until the last character in the string is the newline.

See the link above for more information.

Here is an example on how to read an display a full line of file using a small buffer:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <string.h>

int main()
{
   FILE * pFile;

   const int n = 5;
   char mystring [n];
   int lineLength = 0;

   pFile = fopen ("myfile.txt" , "r");
   if (pFile == NULL) 
   {
       perror ("Error opening file");
   }
   else 
   {

        do 
        {
            fgets (mystring , n , pFile);
            puts (mystring);    
                    lineLength += strlen(mystring); 
        } while(mystring[strlen ( mystring)-1] != '\n' && !feof(pFile));

       fclose (pFile);
   }

   printf("Line Length: %d\n", lineLength);
   return 0;
}
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1  
Isn't this the "I know how to do that when I assume some fixed size of a line" part of the question? –  Jonathan Leffler Apr 8 '11 at 15:56
    
No, you can do more with this with a little modification. If you know the exact size of the line set the length of the string to exactly that + 1. If you know the maximum size of the line set the length of the string to max + 1. But if you don't know at all write a loop around the read and test whether the last character in the read is an end of line character. –  Steve Apr 8 '11 at 16:01
    
I modified the code to better illustrate usage in this instance. –  Steve Apr 8 '11 at 16:13
1  
If you don't check feof(pFile), you risk running into an infinite loop. –  Marlon Apr 8 '11 at 16:14
    
Yeah, I saw your code and was just putting that in. Good catch. –  Steve Apr 8 '11 at 16:17

In C++ you can use the std::getline function, which takes a stream and reads up to the first '\n' character. In C, I would just use fgets and keep reallocating a buffer until the last character is the '\n', then we know we have read the entire line.

C++:

std::ifstream file("myfile.txt");
std::string line;
std::getline(file, line);
std::cout << line;

C:

// I didn't test this code I just made it off the top of my head.
FILE* file = fopen("myfile.txt", "r");
size_t cap = 256;
size_t len = 0;
char* line = malloc(cap);

for (;;) {
    fgets(&line[len], cap - len, file);
    len = strlen(line);
    if (line[len-1] != '\n' && !feof(file)) {
        cap <<= 1;
        line = realloc(line, cap);
    } else {
        break;
    }
}

printf("%s", line);
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getline is only POSIX, here is an ANSI (NO max-line-size info needed!):

const char* getline(FILE *f,char **r)
{
  char t[100];
  if( feof(f) )
    return 0;
  **r=0;
  while( fgets(t,100,f) )
  {
    char *p=strchr(t,'\n');
    if( p )
    {
      *p=0;
      if( (p=strchr(t,'\r')) ) *p=0;
      *r=realloc(*r,strlen(*r)+1+strlen(t));
      strcat(*r,t);
      return *r;
    }
    else
    {
      if( (p=strchr(t,'\r')) ) *p=0;
      *r=realloc(*r,strlen(*r)+1+strlen(t));
      strcat(*r,t);
    }
  }
  return feof(f)?(**r?*r:0):*r;
}

and now it's easy and short in your main:

  char *line,*buffer = malloc(100);
  FILE *f=fopen("yourfile.txt","rb");
  if( !f ) return;
  setvbuf(f,0,_IOLBF,4096);
  while( (line=getline(f,&buffer)) )
    puts(line);
  fclose(f);
  free(buffer);

it works on windows for Windows AND Unix-textfiles, it works on Unix for Unix AND Windows-textfiles

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Here is a C++ way of reading the lines, using std algorithms and iterators:

#include <iostream>
#include <iterator>
#include <vector>
#include <algorithm>

struct getline :
  public std::iterator<std::input_iterator_tag, std::string>
{
    std::istream* in;
    std::string line;
    getline(std::istream& in) : in(&in) {
        ++*this;
    }
    getline() : in(0) {
    }
    getline& operator++() {
        if(in && !std::getline(*in, line)) in = 0;
    }
    std::string operator*() const {
        return line;
    }
    bool operator!=(const getline& rhs) const {
        return !in != !rhs.in;
    }
};

int main() {
    std::vector<std::string> v;
    std::copy(getline(std::cin), getline(), std::back_inserter(v));
}
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