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I wish to know if there is a maner to execute code in c# just once, like one in jquery:

$("#foo").one("click", function() { alert("This will be displayed only once."); });

what i would like to do is the follow:

public void foo(){
  Console.Write("hello");
}

then

foo();
foo();
foo();

and the output result must be

hello

I´m looking for a library and not just using flags attributes.

Thanks in advance.

Sorry for my english.

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1  
Generally, the trick is to not call it in the first place. What problem are you trying to solve? What context will this be used in? Is foo() an event listener? Doing this will violate the expectations of whoever else uses the function –  Cameron Apr 8 '11 at 16:04
2  
Why so keen on using a library? Seems like overkill for something that would be easily solved with the 'flag-based' solution. –  Widor Apr 8 '11 at 16:04
3  
The method could set a static variable that indicates it has already been called. –  tomasmcguinness Apr 8 '11 at 16:05
    
FYI a method that has the same effect when called twice as when called once is called an "idempotent" method. (blogs.msdn.com/b/ericlippert/archive/2005/10/26/483900.aspx) Usually what you do is set a flag that indicates whether the method has been called already or not. –  Eric Lippert Apr 8 '11 at 16:20

6 Answers 6

up vote 6 down vote accepted

I can't imagine why do something like that, but if you really do it and if you want it universal for any method, you can do this:

void Main() {
    var myFoo = callOnlyOnce(foo);
    myFoo();
    myFoo();
    myFoo();

   var myBar = callOnlyOnce(bar);
   myBar();
   myBar();
   myBar();
}

void foo(){
  Console.Write("hello");
}
void bar() { Console.Write("world"); }


Action callOnlyOnce(Action action){
    var context = new ContextCallOnlyOnce();
    Action ret = ()=>{
        if(false == context.AlreadyCalled){
            action();
            context.AlreadyCalled = true;
        }
    };

    return ret;
}
class ContextCallOnlyOnce{
    public bool AlreadyCalled;
} 
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I think the idea is that the logging within foo() is called only once, but this is still a clever solution. It creates the necessary context implicitly as part of the wrapper method and captures it in a closure, which is a nice way of encapsulating it. Still, my guess is this is not sufficient for the real problem the OP needs to solve, as very rarely is the issue that you only want to log once in the entire life of the program. –  Dan Bryant Apr 8 '11 at 16:19
    
@Dan Bryant: Mostly I agree with you. However I don't like global variables, so I think this solution is cleaner. –  TcKs Apr 10 '11 at 9:40

The jQuery example is an event handler, and once the event handler has been called it is removed from the element. The equivalent in C# for (eg.) an button click event would be

myButton.Click += new EventHandler(MyEventHandler)

void MyEventHandler(object sender, EventArgs e)
{
  Console.Write("hello");
  ((Button)sender).Click -= new EventHandler(MyEventHandler);
}

In this way, only the first click of the button would yield the Console Write.

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+1 Removed my answer since this one provides the example. This is the equivalent of the jquery example. –  Ernesto Apr 8 '11 at 16:08
1  
"In this way, only the first click of the button would yield the Console Write." - That is not completely true. If he has multi-threaded code or code that invoked in any number of ad-hoc ways and that can result more then 1 invoke, before handler is removed. Adding [MethodImpl(MethodImplOptions.Synchronized)] before method declaration, would be 1 way to fix this. –  Margus Apr 8 '11 at 16:28
private bool _fooExecuted = false;

public void foo(){
  if (_fooExecuted)
     return;

  _fooExecuted = true;

  Console.Write("hello");
}
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1  
Yeap, but he explicitely asked not to use flags. –  Ernesto Apr 8 '11 at 16:06
1  
@Ernesto: Yeap, but he explicitely asked for a library that doesn't exist. –  FreeAsInBeer Apr 8 '11 at 16:06
    
@Ernesto: he said "flags attributes"... i'm not using any attributes. –  HABJAN Apr 8 '11 at 16:07
    
@FreeAsInBeer, that's absolutely true. @HABJAN, yeap, but I don't know if he actually meant something with attributes. Other than the question been a bit too explicit about what he want's, this answer is a completely right way to solve that problem. –  Ernesto Apr 8 '11 at 16:14

Why do you want a library when you could just do something like this:

private bool wasExecuted = false;

public void foo(){
  if (!wasExecuted) {
     Console.Write("hello");
     wasExecuted = true;
  }
}
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I don't think you're going to find a library for this. This required behavior is very rare, at best. The easiest way to accomplish this would just be to have a static flag variable like so:

static bool hasRun = false;
public void doSomething {
    if (hasRun) {
        return;
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
It's not so rare, I think; it's very common to have some logging functionality, but to want to suppress repeated logging if the condition recurs (such as a connection lost detected in a polling loop, for instance; you don't want to log every reconnect attempt.) This is a bit trickier than simply only logging it once, however, as you need a way to 'reset' and allow logging again once you've successfully connected. –  Dan Bryant Apr 8 '11 at 16:06
    
@Dan: I can see where you're coming from, but at the same time I would want every bit of information I could get if I was hunting down a bug using those logs. –  FreeAsInBeer Apr 8 '11 at 16:07
    
Granted, that's true, but I've run into some really nasty boundary cases with repeated logging of a persistent condition. In one case, the application was actually logging failing camera images and filled up the drive, causing the system to hard-crash. It's a general problem that can occur in any type of 'automatic retry' scenario. Even in less severe cases, it can often make the log harder to read. –  Dan Bryant Apr 8 '11 at 16:13
    
The problem with the static variable is,for instance, if this is a web app, and the method is used in different pages, the only one page will get the code executed. –  Ernesto Apr 8 '11 at 16:20

Do you mean only once in the entire execution of the program or will you ever have a reset criteria that allows it to be displayed again? In either case, I recommend creating a wrapper class that you instantiate as a field with an embedded bool flag for each particular line you want to 'only once' display. If the string is known to be fixed (no parameters that alter it), you can also use a central service class that keeps a set of strings that have already been printed. The issue with this is that you can't log the same string from multiple locations.

One common general solution is an 'alarm manager', though I haven't seen a standardized library for this. It comes up frequently in my industry, however, as industrial machinery can enter a persistent alarm state and you want to log transitions into the alarm state, but not continually log that you're still in the alarm state. The solutions I've used/seen usually create a unique alarm code for each condition, with a 'set' and 'clear' notion, often with operator intervention required to acknowledge and finally clear the alarm.

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