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what is the difference between const int*, const int * const, int const *

Hello everyone,

I wonder if somebody can provide some clarity on the syntax for typedefs when pointers are involved in relation to: - meaning of the position of star; - meaning of the position of const; - interaction between teh two.

I get an idea on what's happening with const and star after I wrote the example below but I got that code simply by trial and error and would like to have a more theoretical explanation from someone knowledgeable.

Thanks

#include <iostream>
using namespace std;

int main() {
    int paolo = 10;

    // POINTERS
    typedef int* PointerToInt1;
    typedef int *PointerToInt2;

    // POINTERS TO CONST
    typedef const int* PointerToConstInt1;
    typedef const int *PointerToConstInt2;
    typedef int const* PointerToConstInt3;
    typedef int const *PointerToConstInt4;
    // qualifying with const twice
    // ignored -  simply gets you a warning
    typedef const int const* PointerToConstInt5;
    typedef const int const *PointerToConstInt6;

    // CONST POINTERS
    typedef int *const ConstPointerInt1;
    typedef int* const ConstPointerInt2;

    // CONST POINTERS TO CONST
    typedef const int *const ConstPointerToConstInt1;

    //  POINTERS
    int *ip1 = &paolo;
    int* ip2 = &paolo;
    PointerToInt1 ip3 = &paolo;
    PointerToInt2 ip4 = &paolo;

    // POINTERS TO CONST
    PointerToConstInt1 ip11;
    PointerToConstInt2 ip12 = &paolo;
    PointerToConstInt3 ip13;
    PointerToConstInt4 ip14 = &paolo;
    PointerToConstInt3 ip15;
    PointerToConstInt4 ip16 = &paolo;

    /*
    //  POINTERS TO CONST 
    //ALL ERROR
    *ip11 = 21;     *ip12 = 23;
    *ip13 = 23;     *ip14 = 23;
    *ip15 = 25;     *ip16 = 23;
    */

    // CONST POINTERS
    // ERROR - No initialiser
    // ConstPointerInt1 ip21;    
    // ConstPointerInt2 ip22;
    int me = 56;
    int you = 56;
    ConstPointerInt1 ip21 = &me;    
    ConstPointerInt1 ip22 = &me;    
    *ip21 = 145;
    *ip22 = 145;

    // ERROR - No initialiser
    // ConstPointerToConstInt1 ip31;

    // ERROR - Cant change  eobjected pointed at 
    ConstPointerToConstInt1 ip31 = &me;
    // ip31 = &you;

    // ERROR - Cant change  the value of objected pointed at 
    ConstPointerToConstInt1 ip33 = &me;
    // *ip31 = 54;


    cout << *ip1 << *ip2 <<  *ip4 <<   endl;
    cout << *ip11 <<  *ip12 << *ip13 << *ip14 << *ip15 <<  *ip16 << endl; 


    return 1;

}
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marked as duplicate by Thomas Matthews, Bo Persson, ralphtheninja, dmckee, Dori Apr 10 '11 at 1:28

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

    
Exact duplicate: stackoverflow.com/questions/1143262/… –  Thomas Matthews Apr 8 '11 at 20:18
    
Other related topics can be found by searching for "c++ const pointer*. @RandomCPlusPlus: Please search before posting. –  Thomas Matthews Apr 8 '11 at 20:19

2 Answers 2

I am not knowledgeable but will give a try to answer.

There is no need of multiple typedef statements for a type.

// POINTERS TO CONST
typedef const int* PointerToConstInt1;
typedef const int *PointerToConstInt2; // Above two represent the same
typedef int const* PointerToConstInt3;
typedef int const *PointerToConstInt4; // 3 & 4 represent the same

Space doesn't really matter here.

int* ptr ;
int *ptr ;  // Both mean the same.

const int* means pointer can point to a different location but the value in the location it is pointing at cannot be changed.

int* const means a const pointer. It cannot point to a different location but can change the value in the location it is pointing at. Since it is a constant pointer it must be initialized while declaration.

const int* const means a constant pointer to a constant value. It can neither point to different location nor change the value in the location it is pointing at. So, it must be initialized while declaration.

ConstPointerToConstInt1 ip31;  // Error : No initialization

ConstPointerToConstInt1 ip31 = &me;
ip31 = &you;  // Error: Trying to modify the pointer to point to a different location

ConstPointerToConstInt1 ip33 = &me;
*ip31 = 54;   // Error: Trying to change the value it is pointing at.

If you understand the above errors, const int* and int* const can be easily understood. Hope it helps !

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Hi Mahesh if my understanding si correct typedef const int* PointerToConstInt1; typedef const int PointerToConstInt2; typedef int const PointerToConstInt3; typedef int const *PointerToConstInt4; should all represent the same.... –  RandomCPlusPlus Apr 8 '11 at 16:44
    
+1: This pretty much sums it all up correctly. –  rubenvb Apr 8 '11 at 16:52
    
typedef int const PointerToConstInt3; typedef const int PointerToConstInt2; represent the same but they are not pointers. They are just typedef for constant integers. const int PI = 3.147; or int const PI = 3.147; –  Mahesh Apr 8 '11 at 16:53
1  
@RandomCPlusPlus - I think you grouped the different semantics perfectly in your code, with your commments. @Mahesh - double check your answer: const int const* should not be a constant pointer to a constant value, but a pointer to a constant value, which happens to be qualified twice. –  rturrado Apr 8 '11 at 17:14
1  
@RandomCPlusPlus - correct. typedef const int *const is the same as typedef int const *const, a constant pointer to a constant value. I think the standard defines that const qualifies whatever is at its left hand side. However, for the typical const type blah expression, most compilers will recognize it to be the same as type const blah. For simplicity, just grab whatever the compiler reads, and read it from right to left. –  rturrado Apr 8 '11 at 17:40

For general rules on using const, there are billions of questions here on StackOverflow. For instance: const usage with pointers in C.

Regarding typedefs, the rule for writing a typedef is the same for writing a variable declaration; the only difference is that you prefix it with typedef, and replace the name of the variable with the name of the typedef! (With a few exceptions, which are typically fixed with parentheses). So, for instance:

char *flaps;

becomes:

typedef char *flaps_type;
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that seems useful - let me think it through –  RandomCPlusPlus Apr 8 '11 at 16:47

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