Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free.

In Java, I have something like this

public class A {
    private String title;
    public A () { 
    // do something
    }

    public void run () {
        B b = new B();
        b.run();
    }

    public void changeTitle(String newTitle) {
        this.title = newTitle;
    } 
}


public class B {
   public B() {
   // do something
   }
   public void run() {

   }
}

My question is in method run() of B, is it possible to invoke method changeTitle() in A to change the title of the instance of A that instantiates B?

Thanks

share|improve this question
    
There is no implicit link between an object and the object that instantiated it. As the masses have said below, you need to make that connection explicit. –  lwburk Apr 8 '11 at 16:52
    
why not just execute it? thats the fastest way i guess. –  Bhushan Apr 8 '11 at 16:54

7 Answers 7

up vote 1 down vote accepted

B can only invoke methods on A if it contains a reference to an instance of A. You could pass an instance of A into B to achieve this.

public void run () {
    B b = new B(this);
    b.run();
}

public class B {
   private A a;
   public B(A a) {
       this.a = a;
       a.changeTitle("Ha!");
  }
}
share|improve this answer

if B accepts a type A in its constructor, and when you say new B, pass in 'this' similar to

public void run () {
    B b = new B(this);
    b.run();
}

now you have a copy of the A object your working with.

share|improve this answer
    
Is it really a copy (ie. new instance) or a reference to the original instance of A? –  Femaref Apr 8 '11 at 16:53
1  
@Fermaref its a reference. –  subsub Apr 8 '11 at 17:09
    
thank subsub, I am by far not an expert on java as you can tell :D. –  Jake Kalstad Apr 8 '11 at 17:17

Sure. Pass an instance of A in the constructor for B.

share|improve this answer

This will only be possible if you pass this as argument when you invoke B's run() method.

share|improve this answer

Not unless you arrange for instances of B to know what instance of A they should do that to (e.g., by passing that into the constructor for B and remembering it).

If you're doing something like this then you should consider, e.g., what you want to happen if an instance of B is created by something other than an instance of A.

share|improve this answer

no. As such an instance of B does not know who created it.

However with B as:

public class B {
   private A creator;

   public B(A creator) {
      this.creator = creator;
      // do something
    ...
  }

and creating new B(this) in A.run(), B could call creator.changeTitle("whatever") in its run() method.

share|improve this answer

Is B is a non static inner class of A you van invoke the mehods of A (and access its fieldes).

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.