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UPDATE: I made major changes to this post - check the revision history for details.

I'm starting to dive into TDD with NUnit and despite I've enjoyed checking some resources I've found here at stackoverflow, I often find myself not gaining good traction.

So what I'm really trying to achieve is to acquire some sort of checklist/workflow —and here's where I need you guys to help me out— or "Test Plan" that will give me decent Code Coverage.

So let's assume an ideal scenario where we could start a project from scratch with let's say a Mailer helper class that would have the following code:

(I've created the class just for the sake of aiding the question with a code sample so any criticism or advice is encouraged and will be very welcome)

Mailer.cs

using System.Net.Mail;
using System;

namespace Dotnet.Samples.NUnit
{
    public class Mailer
    {
        readonly string from;
        public string From { get { return from; } }

        readonly string to;
        public string To { get { return to; } }

        readonly string subject;
        public string Subject { get { return subject; } }

        readonly string cc;
        public string Cc { get { return cc; } }

        readonly string bcc;
        public string BCc { get { return bcc; } }

        readonly string body;
        public string Body { get { return body; } }

        readonly string smtpHost;
        public string SmtpHost { get { return smtpHost; } }

        readonly string attachment;
        public string Attachment { get { return Attachment; } }

        public Mailer(string from = null, string to = null, string body = null, string subject = null, string cc = null, string bcc = null, string smtpHost = "localhost", string attachment = null)
        {
            this.from = from;
            this.to = to;
            this.subject = subject;
            this.body = body;
            this.cc = cc;
            this.bcc = bcc;
            this.smtpHost = smtpHost;
            this.attachment = attachment;
        }

        public void SendMail()
        {
            if (string.IsNullOrEmpty(From))
                throw new ArgumentNullException("Sender e-mail address cannot be null or empty.", from);

            SmtpClient smtp = new SmtpClient();
            MailMessage mail = new MailMessage();
            smtp.Send(mail);
        }
    }
}

MailerTests.cs

using System;
using NUnit.Framework;
using FluentAssertions;

namespace Dotnet.Samples.NUnit
{
    [TestFixture]
    public class MailerTests
    {
        [Test, Ignore("No longer needed as the required code to pass has been already implemented.")]
        public void SendMail_FromArgumentIsNotNullOrEmpty_ReturnsTrue()
        {
            // Arrange
            dynamic argument = null;

            // Act
            Mailer mailer = new Mailer(from: argument);

            // Assert
            Assert.IsNotNullOrEmpty(mailer.From, "Parameter cannot be null or empty.");
        }

        [Test]
        public void SendMail_FromArgumentIsNullOrEmpty_ThrowsException()
        {
            // Arrange
            dynamic argument = null;
            Mailer mailer = new Mailer(from: argument);

            // Act
            Action act = () => mailer.SendMail();
            act.ShouldThrow<ArgumentNullException>();

            // Assert
            Assert.Throws<ArgumentNullException>(new TestDelegate(act));
        }

        [Test]
        public void SendMail_FromArgumentIsOfTypeString_ReturnsTrue()
        {
            // Arrange
            dynamic argument = String.Empty;

            // Act
            Mailer mailer = new Mailer(from: argument);

            // Assert
            mailer.From.Should().Be(argument, "Parameter should be of type string.");
        }

        // INFO: At this first 'iteration' I've almost covered the first argument of the method so logically this sample is nowhere near completed.
        // TODO: Create a test that will eventually require the implementation of a method to validate a well-formed email address.
        // TODO: Create as much tests as needed to give the remaining parameters good code coverage.
    }
}

So after having my first 2 failing tests the next obvious step would be implementing the functionality to make them pass, but, should I keep the failing tests and create new ones after implementing the code that will make those pass, or should I modify the existing ones after making them pass?

Any advice about this topic will really be enormously appreciated.

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1  
Holy indenting Batman! –  StingyJack Apr 8 '11 at 17:53
1  
I would suggest you invert those if-statements to avoid all that indenting. The method would also be easier to read, and refactor. Let me know if you want an example of what I mean. –  Lasse V. Karlsen Apr 8 '11 at 17:55
    
@StingyJack: "haHAhaHAha" -- thanks for the head's up! @Lasse: Good idea, thanks much! I'm refactoring it right now -- either way would be glad if you wanted to share an example. –  Nano Taboada Apr 8 '11 at 17:58
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4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I'd suggest that you pick up some tool like NCover which can hook onto your test cases to give code coverage stats. There is also a community edition of NCover if you don't want the licensed version.

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Interesting! I was just asking @Tejs of a more communitarian alternative. Thanks! –  Nano Taboada Apr 8 '11 at 18:03
    
github.com/sawilde/opencover is what you want. –  David Keaveny Jul 12 '13 at 1:41
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When people (finally!) decide to apply test coverage to an existing code base, it is impractical to test everything; you don't have the resources, and there isn't often a lot of real value.

What you ideally want to do is to make sure that your tests apply to newly written/modified code and anything that might be affected by those changes.

To do this, you need to know:

  • what code you changed. Your source control system will help you here at the level of this-file-changed.

  • what code is executed as a consequence of the new code being executed. For this you need either a static analyzer that can trace the downstream impact of the code (don't know of many of these) or a test coverage tool, which can show what has been executed when you run your specific tests. Any such executed code probably needs re-testing, too.

Because you want to minimize the the amount of test code you write, you clearly want better than file-precision granularity of "changed". You can use a diff tool (often build into your source control system) to help hone the focus to specific lines. Diff tools don't actually understand code structure, so what they report tends to be line-oriented rather than structure oriented, producing rather bigger diffs than necessary; nor do they tell you the convenient point of test access, which is likely to be a method because the whole style of unit test is focused on testing methods.

You can get better diff tools. Our Smart Differencer tools provide differences in terms of program structures (expressions, statements, methods) and abstracting editing operations (insert, delete, copy, move, replace, rename) which can make it easier to interpret the code changes. This doesn't directly solve the "which method changed?" question, but it often means looking at a lot less stuff to make that decision.

You can get test coverage tools that will answer this question. Our Test Coverage tools have a facility to compare previous test coverage runs with current test coverage runs, to tell you which tests have to be re-run. They do so by examining the code differences (something like the Smart Differencer) but abstract the changes back to method level.

share|improve this answer
    
+1 - A lot of this is good advice. –  Tejs Apr 8 '11 at 18:22
5  
-1 - This is an advertisement. –  automagic Apr 8 '11 at 18:37
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If you install TestDriven.net, one of the components (called NCover) actually helps you understand how much of your code is covered by unit test.

Barring that, the best solution is to check each line, and run each test to make sure you've at least hit that line once.

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thanks for the contribution -- I was wondering if there is any FLOSS project that offers similar functionality? –  Nano Taboada Apr 8 '11 at 18:00
    
I'm not familiar with the FLOSS acronym... can you explain? The only google hits seems to be about open source, and I'm not sure if that's what you mean. –  Tejs Apr 8 '11 at 18:02
    
Absolutely, it stands for Free/Libre Open Source Software. en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Free_and_open_source_software –  Nano Taboada Apr 8 '11 at 18:09
    
I'm not familiar with any open source libraries that do this kind of thing, unfortunately =/ –  Tejs Apr 8 '11 at 18:22
    
github.com/sawilde/opencover is your new best friend. –  David Keaveny Jul 12 '13 at 1:41
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If you use a framework like NUnit, there are methods available such as AssertThrows where you can assert that a method throws the required exception given the input: http://www.nunit.org/index.php?p=assertThrows&r=2.5

Basically, verifying expected behavior given good and bad inputs is the best place to start.

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thanks a lot! I'm definitely going to check it out. –  Nano Taboada Apr 8 '11 at 18:02
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