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I am new to C, so forgive me if this question is trivial. I am trying to reverse a string, in my case the letters a,b,c,d. I place the characters in a char* array, and declare a buffer which will hold the characters in the opposite order, d,c,b,a. I achieve this result using pointer arithmetic, but to my understanding each element in a char* array is 4 bytes, so when I do the following: buffer[i] = *(char**)letters + 4; I am supposed to be pointing at the second element in the array. Instead of pointing to the second element, it points to the third. After further examination I figured that if I increment the base pointer by two each time I would get the desired results. Does this mean that each element in the array is two bytes instead of 4? Here is the rest of my code:

#include <stdio.h>

int main(void)
{

  char *letters[] = {"a","b","c","d"};
  char *buffer[4];
  int i, add = 6;

  for( i = 0 ; i < 4 ; i++ )
  {
    buffer[i] = *(char**)letters + add;
    add -= 2;
  }

  printf("The alphabet: ");

  for(i = 0; i < 4; i++)
  {
    printf("%s",letters[i]);
  }

  printf("\n");

  printf("The alphabet in reverse: ");

  for(i = 0; i < 4; i++)
  {
    printf("%s",buffer[i]);
  }

  printf("\n");

}
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4 Answers 4

You're not making an array of characters: you're making an array of character strings -- i.e., an array of pointers to arrays of characters. I am not going to rewrite the whole program for you of course, but I'll start out with two alternative possible correct declarations for your main data structure:

char letters[] = {'a','b','c','d, 0};

char * letters = "abcd";

Either of these declares an array of five characters: a, b, c, d followed by 0, the traditional ending for a character string in C.

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I think he knows. That's why it is a char* array and not a char array, and also why he expected each to be 4 bytes, not 1. –  ughoavgfhw Apr 8 '11 at 18:18
    
This answer has a serious error that, coupled with typical C newbies' misunderstandings, is quite harmful. char *letters[]; is not an array of strings. It's an array of pointers to strings. A char * is not a string. It's a pointer which can point to the beginning of a string. A string is an array type object. –  R.. Apr 8 '11 at 22:35
    
@R: You are correct that my wording was poor, although I am not sure that I'd call it either "serious" or "harmful". I've clarified my post. –  Ernest Friedman-Hill Apr 8 '11 at 23:04

Another thing: rather than making assumptions about the size of things, use the language to tell you. For instance:

char   *my_array[]            = { "foo" , "bar" , "baz" , "bat" , } ;
// the size of an element of my_array
size_t  my_array_element_size = sizeof(my_array[0]) ;
size_t  alt_element_size      = size(*my_array) ; // arrays are pointers under the hood
// the number of elements in my_array
size_t  my_array_element_cnt  = sizeof(my_array) / sizeof(*myarray ;
// the size of a char
size_t  char_size             = sizeof(*(my_array[0])) ; // size of a char

Another thing: understand your data structures (as noted above). You talk about chars, but your data structures are talking about strings. Your declarations:

char *letters[] = {"a","b","c","d"};
char *buffer[4];

get parsed as follows:

  • letters is an array of pointers to char (which happen to be nul-terminated C-style strings), and it's initialized with 4 elements.
  • Like letters, buffer is an array of 4 pointers to char, but uninitialized.

You are not actually dealing individual chars anywhere, even in the printf() statements: the %s specifier says the argument is a nul-terminated string. Rather, you're dealing with strings (aka pointers to char) and arrays of the same.

An easier way:

#include <stdio.h>

int main(void)
{

  char   *letters[]  = { "a" , "b" , "c" , "d" , }    ;
  size_t  letter_cnt = size(letters)/sizeof(*letters) ;
  char   *buffer[sizeof(letters)/sizeof(*letters)]    ;

  for ( int i=0 , j=letter_cnt ; i < letter_cnt ; ++i )
  {
    buffer[--j] = letters[i] ;
  }

  printf("The alphabet: ");
  for( int i = 0 ; i < letter_cnt ; ++i )
  {
    printf("%s",letters[i]);
  }
  printf("\n");

  printf("The alphabet in reverse: ");
  for( int i=0 ; i < letter_cnt ; i++ )
  {
    printf("%s",buffer[i]);
  }
  printf("\n");

}

BTW, is this homework?

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No, this isn't homework, just for my own amusement. I know how to work with pointers and such using assembler, but in assembler there is no data types per se, you work with raw bytes. So C, with this example specifically, seems like a good place to start. –  EDD Apr 8 '11 at 20:31
    
If you're an assembler programmer, you'll like C. You might call it a clean, abstracted assembler language &mdash; without [most of] the headaches usually associated with assembler. Good Luck! –  Nicholas Carey Apr 8 '11 at 22:42

This is a case of operator precedence. When you use buffer[i] = *(char**)letters + add;, the * before the cast is performed before the +, making this code equivalent to (*(char**)letters) + add;. The first part is equivalent to the address of the first element in your array, the string "a". Since using string constant automatically adds a null byte, this points to 'a\0'. It happens that the compiler placed all four strings immediately after each other in memory, so if you go past the end of that string you flow into the next. When you add to the pointer, you are moving through this character array: 'a\0b\0c\0d\0'. Notice that each character is 2 bytes after the last. Since this is only true because the compiler placed the 4 strings directly after each other, you should never depend on it (it won't even work if you tried to re-reverse your other string). Instead, you need to put in parentheses to make sure the addition happens before the dereference, and use the 4 byte pointer size. (Of course, as pointed out by Nicholas, you shouldn't assume the size of anything. Use sizeof to get the size of a pointer instead.)

buffer[i] = *((char**)letters + add);
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char *letters[] = {"a","b","c","d"};

I think you didn't get the pointer arithmetic correctly. letters is an array of pointers and when incremented by 1 makes to go to next row.

letters + 1 ; // Go to starting location of 2 row, i.e., &"b"

char *letters[] = { "abc" , "def" } ;

(letters + 1) ; // Point to the second row's first element, i.e., &"d"

*((*letters) + 1) ;  // Get the second element of the first row. i.e., "b"
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