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What are typical uses of null statement
;
in C ?


(I know that it is basically used to skip expression where it is expected by the compiler, but here I'm interested only in real-world examples of such use cases...)

Thanks

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7  
I prefer {} if you need an empty statement, it looks to me less likely to be accidental. So "never" ;-) –  Steve Jessop Apr 8 '11 at 18:48
1  
{} is not useful in some of the contexts ; would be useful in. –  R.. Apr 8 '11 at 21:43
    
@R..: which ones? As an empty statement, I mean - we've already got that in for statements you might write (; or ;;, and since the parts omitted aren't statements (rather declarations or expressions), {} won't do. Obviously there are places in C where you can't just replace a semi-colon with {}. Almost all of them. But that's not what I meant :-) –  Steve Jessop Apr 9 '11 at 20:04
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11 Answers

up vote 17 down vote accepted

It's typically the side-effect of a code block that was stripped by the preprocessor, like

#if DEBUG
    #define ASSERT(_x) Assert(x)
#else
    #define ASSERT(_x)
#endif


ASSERT(test);    // Results in null statement in non-debug builds

That, or in loops where your condition already contains whatever needs to be done in each iteration.

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4  
Wow, thats an interesting one... –  Agnius Vasiliauskas Apr 8 '11 at 18:43
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while (*(dst++) = *(src++))
    ;
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After a label at the end of a function (or more precisely, at the end of any block), e.g.

void foo(void)
{
    // ...

exit:
    ;
}
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7  
I would totally put return; instead. –  Steve Jessop Apr 8 '11 at 18:51
8  
@steve The label can come at the end of any block, so return isn't always appropriate. An example is a multiply nested loop when you want to continue an outer loop from within inner loop (of course, you could use label: continue; } instead of label: ;}). –  Jim Balter Apr 8 '11 at 19:21
    
@Jim: or you could write continue; instead of goto label;. I believe there are uses for this, possibly even ones less crazy than, "I go to the label defined by some macro, hence I can't substitute continue in one special case". I just don't think I've ever seen one. –  Steve Jessop Apr 9 '11 at 19:58
1  
@Steve Please read what I wrote again: "continue an outer loop from within inner loop" -- just writing continue; would continue the wrong loop. The Bliss language had no goto but did have loop labels for break/continue of outer loops; too bad C doesn't have that. –  Jim Balter Apr 11 '11 at 5:52
1  
@Jim: OK, I see. Yes, continuing an outer for loop requires a do-nothing statement. Loop labels are very rarely missed, but on the occasions when you do want one it's particularly annoying they aren't there, since it leads to silly arguments whether you should refactor into extra functions to avoid using "goto". –  Steve Jessop Apr 11 '11 at 8:55
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while (somethingWithSideEffects()) ;
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Example:

 while (!kbhit())
     ;

Should be self-explanatory.

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The only uses I can think of are:

1- At the end of a loop, where the operations are already encoded within the loop statements. e.g. while(a[i--]);

2- At the end of a label, where no operation is needed to be done. e.g. Label: ;

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I have used it, albeit rarely, in a possibly unusual situation (and one that some/many people would find wrong). I have had to sometimes write a very complex if condition without an else clause where the if condition has to be negated. Obviously it can be something like this:

if ( !( overly complex condition ) )
  {
  do stuff
  }

It sometimes makes more sense (to me at least) to think of it in terms of positive logic. In other words, if the overly complex condition holds true, I don't want the code to run. So I have instead written it as:

if ( overly complex condition )
  ;  // do nothing
else
  {
  do stuff
  }  
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1  
I find it's better to break it down into multiple if. It's still going to be complex if you remove the !( ). –  ikegami Apr 8 '11 at 19:17
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It's more of a null expression rather than a null statement, but it's often found in for loops.

for (;;)                 // Loop "forever"

for (int i=10; i--; )    // 9..0

etc

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5  
Technically that's not a null statement. 6.8.3 of C99 defines a null statement as an expression-statement with no expression, whereas this is an iteration-statement with fewer than 3 of its optional expression s. The three things in the parentheses of a for loop aren't statements, they're semi-colon-separated expressions, which is why you can't write for(int i=10; i--; {}) Nit-picky, I know :-) –  Steve Jessop Apr 8 '11 at 18:56
2  
@Steve Jessop, I did say it wasn't a null statement, but thanks for the extra technical details. –  ikegami Apr 8 '11 at 19:13
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I can think of scanf validation. scanf gets stuck when user didn't give the correct input. So, to prevent scanf from being stuck, characters until end of line must be removed.

if( scanf("%d",&integer) == 0 )
{
    while( getchar() != '\n' ) ;
    // ....
}
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Unit tests for a compliant compiler.

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See this other SO post: min macro in kernel.h

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