Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I can do a simple array of sets: set < char > * words = new set < char > [10] How I can do a vector of sets? This results in a compiler error: vector < set< char >> v . Thank you for answers!

share|improve this question
1  
Repeating the title in the question is not recommended and it is a poorly ask question. Add details, code you have tried, examples you have seen, what you are trying to accomplish etc. –  Joe Apr 8 '11 at 19:03
    
Please explain what you're trying to do and what you mean by dynamic array of sets. –  Alexander Gessler Apr 8 '11 at 19:03
    
vector<set<type> > arrSets; This will create a dynamic array (vector) of sets. Is that what you are asking? –  Naveen Apr 8 '11 at 19:09
1  
(They did the sets) They did the vec-tor of sets! (They did the sets) It was pure programming sex! –  Potatoswatter Apr 8 '11 at 19:29
2  
Isn't it obvious that he's wondering why the >> is causing an error? I fixed the wording a bit. Seems like a legitimate question to me. Voting to re-open. –  Emile Cormier Apr 8 '11 at 19:39
show 3 more comments

2 Answers

Instead of '>>' try '> >'... like so:

vector<set<char> > testVect;
share|improve this answer
add comment

If vector < set< char >> v is exactly what you've got there (I hope you cut and pasted), you've run into one of the annoying little features of C++.

Those >> look to you like two closing angle brackets for two templates. They look like a right shift operator to the compiler. Change them to > > with a space in between.

Fortunately, this is being addressed in the C++ standard that should be ratified this year. Unfortunately, you aren't working with a C++11-compliant compiler just now.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.