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CREATE TABLE #t(LocationCode varchar(10), ResourceId int, TransType char(3))

INSERT #t
SELECT 'STORE 001', 1, 'In' UNION ALL

SELECT 'STORE 002', 2, 'In' UNION ALL

SELECT 'STORE 003', 3, 'In' UNION ALL

SELECT 'STORE 001', 1, 'Out' UNION ALL
SELECT 'STORE 004', 1, 'In'  UNION ALL

SELECT 'STORE 004', 4, 'In' UNION ALL
SELECT 'STORE 004', 4, 'Out' UNION ALL

SELECT 'STORE 004', 1, 'Out' UNION ALL
SELECT 'STORE 001', 1, 'In'  

DROP TABLE #t

How to show only the items with the corresponding location having maximum number of "Ins" when compared with "Outs" (sorry for my bad english).

LocationCode              ResourceId
STORE 001[edited]         1
STORE 002                 2
STORE 003                 3
share|improve this question
3  
What do you mean by "recent location?" In other words, can you clarify how you arrived at that expected result set? – Joe Stefanelli Apr 8 '11 at 19:31
1  
Sorry, it was ambiguous, my bad. I will edit the question. Thank you. – Nick Binnet Apr 8 '11 at 19:33
1  
A question, could have a repeated row? for example, 'STORE 001', 1, 'In', This would be because was admitted again a Resource. – Longha Apr 8 '11 at 19:55
1  
By "omit unwanted results", I meant "display items with respective location despite of where they had been". As in the question, the ResourceId 1 was initially at "STORE 1", later moved to "STORE 4", and then finally sent back again to the previous location "STORE 1". In this case, the ResourceId 1 is in "STORE 1" (which is important). – Nick Binnet Apr 8 '11 at 19:59
up vote 6 down vote accepted

Assuming you only want Ins where there isn't a matching Out.

SELECT *
FROM #t AS a
WHERE a.TransType = 'In'
    AND NOT EXISTS (
        SELECT *
        FROM #t AS b
        WHERE b.TransType = 'Out'
            AND b.LocationCode = a.LocationCode
            AND b.ResourceId = a.ResourceId
    )

You'd need more data in your schema to be able to match an Out with an In by time.

Try something simpler like this:

SELECT LocationCode, ResourceID
FROM #t
GROUP BY LocationCode, ResourceID
HAVING COUNT(*) % 2 = 1

Here's an example where the transactions are sequenced and two ways to use that sequence:

CREATE TABLE #t(LocationCode varchar(10), ResourceId int, TransType char(3), Seq int UNIQUE NOT NULL)

INSERT #t
SELECT 'STORE 001', 1, 'In', 1 UNION ALL
SELECT 'STORE 002', 2, 'In', 2 UNION ALL
SELECT 'STORE 003', 3, 'In', 3 UNION ALL
SELECT 'STORE 001', 1, 'Out', 4 UNION ALL
SELECT 'STORE 004', 1, 'In', 5 UNION ALL
SELECT 'STORE 004', 4, 'In', 6 UNION ALL
SELECT 'STORE 004', 4, 'Out', 7 UNION ALL
SELECT 'STORE 004', 1, 'Out', 8 UNION ALL
SELECT 'STORE 001', 1, 'In', 9 

;WITH Ins AS (
SELECT * FROM #t
WHERE TransType = 'In'
)
,Outs AS (
SELECT * FROM #t
WHERE TransType = 'Out'
)
,Matched AS (
SELECT *,
(SELECT MIN(Seq)
FROM Outs
WHERE Outs.LocationCode = Ins.LocationCode
AND Outs.ResourceID = Ins.ResourceID
AND Outs.Seq > Ins.Seq) AS OutSeq
FROM Ins
)
SELECT *
FROM Matched
WHERE OutSeq IS NULL

;WITH LastIn AS (
SELECT ResourceID, MAX(Seq) AS Seq
FROM #t
WHERE TransType = 'In'
GROUP BY ResourceID
)
SELECT *
FROM LastIn
WHERE NOT EXISTS (
SELECT *
FROM #t outs
WHERE outs.TransType = 'Out'
AND Outs.ResourceID = LastIn.ResourceID
AND outs.Seq > LastIn.Seq)

DROP TABLE #t​​​​​​​​​​​
share|improve this answer
1  
+1 Nice job reading between the lines. – Joe Stefanelli Apr 8 '11 at 19:38
1  
+1 Nice point about needing more data to match Out with an In by time – Conrad Frix Apr 8 '11 at 19:40
1  
@Nick Binnet I posted something a little simpler on the end of my answer which assumes an item can only be in a location with an odd number of entries (assuming all outs had an in). – Cade Roux Apr 8 '11 at 20:03
1  
@Nick Binnet So it wouldn't have an out? Why would the most ins be right? What if it went in/out/in/out of 1 and 2 over and over and then into 3? Wouldn't 3 then be the current location, but it would have the least ins? – Cade Roux Apr 8 '11 at 20:11
1  
@Nick Binnet I would add that there is certainly a way to match things up exactly (including spotting potential orphan issues), but you would need some kind of ordering column in your data on which to join things to their matches. Without an ordering, an Out could match to any In on the same Location/Resource. – Cade Roux Apr 8 '11 at 20:18

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