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Is there any way for an interface class to enforce a definition of the copy constructor and maybe of also other constructors? In my case, I have an IResource pure abstract class, and I want all classes that implement this interface to define a copy-constr, a constructor for loading from a file, and a constructor for loading from memory.

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Why is that important? You can't enforce that the resource is actually loaded from file anyway? As far as I can see, having the same constructors would really be needed if you construct things in a template. Which should already solve your problem. - As to copy constructor, you'd probably rather want a clone method, although I doubt you can enforce a class not directly derived from the interface to actually implement it. –  UncleBens Apr 8 '11 at 21:15
    
...? It's important because I want to ensure all my resources provide the same interface to the programmer and behave in a consistent manner. –  Paul Manta Apr 8 '11 at 21:29
1  
//All implementations of IResource must have a publicly accessible copy constructor; violators of this rule will be terminated should do the trick –  Dennis Zickefoose Apr 9 '11 at 1:02
1  
-1: Anyone trying to this is putting the cart in front of the horse. You're not using inheritance for it's intended purpose, which is runtime polymorphic behavior. If you don't need run time polymorphism, then you should be using composition rather than inheritance. –  Billy ONeal Apr 9 '11 at 4:38

4 Answers 4

In order to construct an object, you need to know the concrete class to use (how would it otherwise know how much memory to allocate, or which virtual table to use, etc..?). As such, the interface is not in play when dealing with constructors, and you can't use interfaces (pure virtuals) to enforce the existence of such a constructor. It's kind of natural when you think about it, virtuals only work when you have a polymorphic object, i.e. after instantiation. Anyone referencing your IResource interface would only ever deal with instantiated objects, and never touch a constructor.

You can enforce these kind of constraints on stuff using templates if you want though. By simply calling the copy constructor from a templated function, the compiler will complain if it encounters a template instantiation using a type which does not have a copy constructor.

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Note that by "calling the copy constructor", one means you'll have to use the CRTP. –  Billy ONeal Apr 8 '11 at 21:00
    
@Billy: Yes, or possibly some variation involving even more templates. –  Ben Voigt Apr 8 '11 at 21:57

You cannot enforce that and it would not be a right way either. On the contrary, you should prevent the usage of public copy constructors in a polymorphic class hierarchy...

struct IResource {
    virtual IResource* Clone() const = 0;
    virtual ~IResource() {}
};

An implementer of IResource should follow this pattern:

class ConcreteResource : public IResource, public boost::noncopyable { // or equivalent
public:
    virtual ConcreteResource* Clone() const;

    explicit ConcreteResource(std::string const & pString) : mString(pString) {}
private:
    std::string mString;
};

ConcreteResource* ConcreteResource::Clone() const {
    return new ConcreteResource(this->mString);
}
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Something in your project uses the IResource abstract class and somehow I doubt that it requires that the objects it uses contain particular constructors.

Something else creates IResource objects (possibly lots of things) and to do that it must use a constructor. The concrete classes that get created must implement the necessary constructors or the code will not compile.

So the answer to your question is that you enforce the presence of the constructors by using those constructors in some other code to create objects. Keep in mind, if the constructors aren't being used anywhere, they aren't necessary.

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I disagree. Sometimes It's better to provide some functions, even if you are not sure you're going to use them, simply because their existence is implied by something else. If you define operator>, for example, you should also define operator<, even if you're not going to use it. In my case, I have functions for loading the resource fom file or from memory; it is expected to also be possible to load the resource directly from the constructor, if you so desire. –  Paul Manta Apr 9 '11 at 2:08
    
@Paul: Actually, you shouldn't. You should have the standard relational operators do it instead. And Daniel is right -- anything you write should at least be used by a Unit Test, and preferably more than that. –  Billy ONeal Apr 9 '11 at 4:36
    
@Paul: The problem vis-a-vis this question though, is whether it is reasonable for an interface to make such a requirement. An interface exists in order to specify how a particular context uses its objects not how they were initially created. –  Daniel T. Apr 9 '11 at 15:50

you can push all requirements to the resource implementations like so:

class t_resource_interface {
protected:
    virtual ~t_resource_interface();
public:
    virtual t_serialization* serializeResource() = 0;
    virtual t_thing* cloneResource() = 0;
};

/* type disambiguators */
typedef enum t_load_from_url { LoadFromURL = 0 } t_load_from_url;
typedef enum t_load_from_memory { LoadFromMemory = 0 } t_load_from_memory;
typedef enum t_copy_constructor { CopyConstructor = 0 } t_copy_constructor;

template < typename TResourceImplementation >
class t_resource : public t_resource_interface {
public:
/* copy ctor should generally be avoided due to the expense. introduce a parameter for those cases where it's really needed and disable the standard copy ctor */
    t_resource(const t_copy_constructor& copyCtor, const t_resource& other) : t_resource_interface(), d_implementation(TResourceImplementation::CopyConstructor(other.d_implementation)) {
        MONUnusedParameter(copyCtor);
    }

    t_resource(const t_load_from_url& fromFile, const t_url& url) : t_resource_interface(), d_implementation(TResourceImplementation::LoadFromURL(url)) {
        MONUnusedParameter(fromFile);
    }

    t_resource(const t_load_from_memory& fromMemory, const t_serialization& serialization) : t_resource_interface(), d_implementation(TResourceImplementation::LoadFromMemory(serialization)) {
        MONUnusedParameter(fromMemory);
    }

    virtual ~t_resource() {
    }

public:
/* t_resource_interface requirements. implementation forwarded to TResourceImplementation */
    virtual t_serialization* serializeResource() {
        return this->d_implementation->serializeResource();
    }

    virtual t_thing* cloneResource() {
        return this->d_implementation->cloneResource();
    }

private:
/* assuming you will end up needing dynamic allocation/polymorphism along the way... */
    t_auto_pointer<TResourceImplementation> d_implementation;
private:
/* prohibited */
    t_resource(const t_resource&);
    t_resource& operator=(const t_resource&);
};

class t_image_resource_implementation : public t_resource_interface {
private:
    static t_image_resource_implementation* ValidationCheck(const t_image_resource_implementation* const arg) {
        assert(arg && "allocation or argument error");
        if (0 == arg) {
            return 0;
        }
        else if (0 == arg->isValid()) {
            delete res;
            return 0;
        }
        else {
            return arg;
        }
    }

public:

    static t_image_resource_implementation* CopyConstructor(const t_image_resource_implementation* const other) {
        return ValidationCheck(new t_image_resource_implementation(other, ...));
    }

    static t_image_resource_implementation* LoadFromURL(const t_url& url) {
    /* assuming t_image_at_url_resource_implementation exists */
        return ValidationCheck(new t_image_at_url_resource_implementation(url, ...));
    }

    static t_image_resource_implementation* LoadFromMemory(const t_serialization& serialization) {
        assert(serialization);
        if (0 == serialization) {
            return 0;
        }
        else {
            return ValidationCheck(new t_image_resource_implementation(serialization, ...));
        }
    }

/* some physical ctors and the rest of the implementation... */

public:
/* t_resource_interface requirements */
    virtual t_serialization* serializeResource() {
        return this->createSerialization();
    }

    virtual t_thing* cloneResource() {
        return this->clone();
    }
};

typedef t_resource<t_image_resource_implementation> t_image_resource;

t_error_code ConvertImageToGrayscale(const t_url& sourceUrl, const t_url& destinationUrl) {
    t_image_resource imageResource(LoadFromURL, sourceUrl);
    /* ... */
}
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