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I have the following error on the build server for code that compiles and passes tests fine locally.

(150): The imported project "C:\Program Files\MSBuild\Microsoft\VisualStudio\v10.0\WebApplications\Microsoft.WebApplication.targets" was not found. Confirm that the path in the declaration is correct, and that the file exists on disk.

I've added the WebApplications folder from my local machine to the appropriate path on the build server but I'm still getting the same error on build.

I believe the recommended approach with TFS2008 was to install VS2008 in it's entirety on the build server. Is this still the case with TFS2010 and VS2010 accordingly? a.k.a Sledgehammer to crack a nut.

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What, exactly, do you think is going to build your code, if not Visual Studio 2010? –  John Saunders Apr 9 '11 at 1:42
    
@John Saunders How about TFS having installed the required components during install. –  Darren Lewis Apr 9 '11 at 7:46
3  
VS project files are just MSBuild files so I'd expect it to install all of the required MSBuild targets. You don't need VS to build a .NET project so I don't think it's reasonable to expect to have to install it on the build server. In a large build environment with many agents, that's a large maintenance overhead. If and when new targets are released out of band we should have a means of deploying these to the build environment without having to run VS install. –  Darren Lewis Apr 9 '11 at 17:57
1  
@John Saunders you might want to research a bit about using MSBuild ( provided by the .NET Framework not Visual Studio ) and related build engines without needing Visual Studio on your build box. It was the stated goal of Microsoft but many teams have failed to deliver thus unfortunatly needing Visual Studio in many situations. –  Christopher Painter Mar 9 '12 at 15:54
1  
Then what exactly did you mean by what's going to build your code it not VS2010? FWIW, I know the whole ALM space very, very well. The original intention from Microsoft with the .NET framework, CSC and MSBuild was that you shouldn't need Visual Studio to build your software. The different teams at DevDiv have done a horrible job at following this design though. –  Christopher Painter Mar 9 '12 at 18:05

4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Pretty much, especially if you plan on using other features like MSTest. You can try just adding the targets file but you'll probably still have some missing dependencies. You could go through the whole process of fixing the dependencies as you go along but it's probably easier just to install VS 2010 and be done with it.

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This blog post seems to describe a way to do what you want without having to install additional software on the build server.

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(this is a comment, but it's a big comment)

In answer to @Daz, I ran a quick PowerShell command to find all the target files on my system:

PS C:\Windows\system32> gci -recurse "C:\Program Files" | 
    where {$_.Extension -eq ".targets"} | 
    format-wide -p "Name"-Column 1

Microsoft.VisualStudio.OfficeTools.targets
Workflow.Targets
Workflow.VisualBasic.Targets
Workflow.Targets
Workflow.VisualBasic.Targets

PS C:\Windows\system32> gci -recurse "C:\Program Files (x86)" | 
    where {$_.Extension -eq ".targets"} | 
    format-wide -p "Name" -column 1

Microsoft.FSharp.targets
Microsoft.Office.InfoPath.targets
Microsoft.Common.targets
Microsoft.Silverlight.v4.0.WindowsPhone.targets
Microsoft.CloudService.targets
Microsoft.Silverlight.Common.targets
Microsoft.Silverlight.CSharp.targets
Microsoft.Silverlight.VisualBasic.targets
Microsoft.Ria.Client.targets
Microsoft.Ria.Client.VisualStudio.targets
Microsoft.Silverlight.Common.targets
Microsoft.Silverlight.CSharp.targets
Microsoft.Silverlight.VisualBasic.targets
Microsoft.Phone.PreImport.targets
Microsoft.Silverlight.Common.targets
Microsoft.Silverlight.CSharp.targets
Microsoft.Silverlight.VisualBasic.targets
Microsoft.Silverlight.WindowsPhone.Overrides.targets
Microsoft.TeamFoundation.Build.targets
Microsoft.VisualStudio.TeamArchitect.LayerDesigner.targets
Microsoft.VisualStudio.TeamArchitect.ModelingProject.targets
Microsoft.CodeAnalysis.Targets
Microsoft.VisualStudio.Tools.Office.targets
Microsoft.ReportingServices.targets
Microsoft.VisualStudio.SharePoint.targets
Microsoft.Data.Schema.Common.targets
Microsoft.Data.Schema.SqlClr.targets
Microsoft.Data.Schema.SqlTasks.Dac.targets
Microsoft.Data.Schema.SqlTasks.targets
Microsoft.Data.Schema.TSqlTasks.targets
Microsoft.TeamTest.targets
Microsoft.VsSDK.Common.targets
Microsoft.VsSDK.Cpp.targets
Microsoft.VsSDK.targets
Microsoft.Web.Publishing.AllFilesInProjectFolder.targets
Microsoft.Web.Publishing.AllFilesInTheProject.targets
Microsoft.Web.Publishing.OnlyFilesToRunTheApp.targets
Microsoft.Web.Publishing.targets
Microsoft.WebApplication.targets
Microsoft.VisualStudio.Tools.Office.Office2003.targets
Microsoft.VisualStudio.Tools.Office.Office2007.targets
Microsoft.ReportingServices.targets
Microsoft.WebApplication.targets
Workflow.Targets
Workflow.VisualBasic.Targets
Workflow.Targets
Workflow.VisualBasic.Targets
Microsoft.Xna.GameStudio.ContentPipelineExtensions.targets
Microsoft.Xna.GameStudio.targets
Microsoft.Xna.GameStudio.AvailablePlatforms.targets
Microsoft.Xna.GameStudio.Common.targets
Microsoft.Xna.GameStudio.Content.targets
Microsoft.Xna.GameStudio.ContentPipeline.targets
Microsoft.Xna.GameStudio.Windows Phone.targets
Microsoft.Xna.GameStudio.Windows.targets
Microsoft.Xna.GameStudio.XBL.targets
Microsoft.Xna.GameStudio.Xbox 360.targets
Microsoft.BuildSteps.targets
Microsoft.Cpp.InvalidPlatform.targets
Microsoft.Cpp.targets
Microsoft.CppBuild.targets
Microsoft.CppClean.targets
Microsoft.CppCommon.targets
Microsoft.MakeFile.targets
lc.targets
masm.targets
Microsoft.Cpp.Win32.targets
Microsoft.Cpp.Win32.v100.targets
Microsoft.Cpp.Win32.v90.targets

I have Visual Studio Ultimate installed on my machine. That's a lot of targets.

Yet, some of these target files weren't here a week ago. That's when I installed XNA Game Studio along with the development tools for Windows Phone 7. These tools have not been installed on my build system, so I couldn't do a TFS Build of any code that requires them. In fact, they could not have been installed with the TFS Build installation, because they literally did not exist at the time - these tools were only released a few months ago.

Note also, that it's not just a matter of the .targets files. These files reference MSBUILD tasks and other tools which are installed at the same time as the .targets files.

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I discovered that if you're going to do just "standard" (i realize that's open to interpretation) web apps and non-web apps (e.g. services), you can get away with installing just Visual Studio 2010 Shell, plus Visual Studio 2010 SP1 on the build server. That will get you the missing .targets files.

Since a full VS install is required for advanced features, does anyone know if the build-server-install license cost is waived?

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