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Right now I'm creating a stack class. The main program is:

class Program
{
    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        Queue myQue = new Queue(5);
        Stack myStack = new Stack(5);

        myStack.Push(1);
        myStack.Push(2);
        myStack.Push(3);
        myStack.Push(4);
        myStack.Push(5);
        myStack.Push(6);

        while (!myStack.IsEmpty)
        {
            Console.WriteLine(myStack.Pop());
        }

        Console.WriteLine(myStack.Pop());

        Console.WriteLine("End of Stack");
    }
}

Then the Stack Class is as follows:

class Stack
{

    private int top;

    private int[] anArray;

    public bool IsFull
    {
        get
        {         
            return top == anArray.Length - 1;
        }
    }

    public bool IsEmpty
    {
        get
        {
            return top == -1;
        }
    }

    public void Push(int valueToPush)
    {

        if (IsFull)
        {
            //do nothing
        }
        else
        {
            anArray[top] = valueToPush;
            top = top + 1;
        }
    }
    public int Pop()
    {
        if (IsEmpty)
        {
            //do nothing
            return 
        }
        else
        {
            int pop = anArray[top];
            top = top -1;
            return pop;
        }
    }
}

The issues I am having is that I need to return nothing if it is empty but it won't let me return NULL because of type int.

Then I think I either skipped/don't understand what a "Constructor" is. I understand that when I instantiate "Stack myStack = new Stack(5);" That it is sending the stack class "5" but how do I get that 5 in the stack class into the array?

share|improve this question
    
The provided Stack class does not has a constructor that takes an integer. Are you sure thats what your using? The System.Collections.Stack has one with a single integer, and it sets the initial size of the stack, it does not push anything into it. –  asawyer Apr 8 '11 at 21:08
1  
This sounds a lot like a class assignment? –  James Michael Hare Apr 8 '11 at 21:11
    
Im creating a stack class, not using the one defined by C# itself. I figured I needed to make a constructor in the Stack class to take that 5 and then make it the array length. –  Nogg Apr 8 '11 at 21:11
    
Why don't you include a constructor in Stack such as Stack(int i) ? Also if you need to return null on Pop, you can use nullable int. Personally I would throw an exception –  WorldIsRound Apr 8 '11 at 21:12
    
+1 on exception, popping on an empty stack is a logical error and should not be graceful (and typically isn't in most class libraries). However, if that is your requirement (whether for class or work) then yes a nullable int (System.Nullable<int> ==or== int?) would do. –  James Michael Hare Apr 8 '11 at 21:14

4 Answers 4

You don't have a constructor.

Add something like this to your stack class:

public Stack(int num)
{
    Push(num);
}

Just read your comment that you want the number to be used to create the size of the array so in that way you can do:

int arrayLength;
public Stack(int num)
{
    arrayLength = num;
    //doSomething() -> call a method or just create the array
}
share|improve this answer

One option you have to return null is to change the return type to int? but then you will be working with a nullable type rather than directly with an int.

public int? Pop()
    {
        if (IsEmpty)
        {
            //do nothing
            return null;
        }
...

As far as constructors go this is how you will set up your class. Is 5 suppose to determine the size of your stack or is it supposed to be the first thing added to the stack?

For example if the constructor was designed to set up the size of the stack you would do the following.

class Stack
{

    private int top;

    private int[] anArray;

    //This is your constructor. It will guarantee that your anArray will be initialized
    public Stack(int size)
    {
        anArray = new int[size];
    }

    ...
share|improve this answer
    
I think you mean anArray = new int[size]; –  Pete Apr 8 '11 at 21:14
    
I was editing that then I saw your comment :) –  Joe Apr 8 '11 at 21:15
    
Well, the 5 is what the arraylength needs to be. And the push.(1) is the first number in the array. –  Nogg Apr 8 '11 at 21:29
    
Ok, thats good then that is what my example is set up for. –  Joe Apr 8 '11 at 21:31
    
Yessir, and it worked perfectly. The only issue now is the return. I think changing it to nullable type is making my program crater. –  Nogg Apr 8 '11 at 21:40

In most cases when you create a stack (new Stack(5)), you're passing the value 5, which is used used to determine the SIZE of the stack(see http://www.csharpfriends.com/Articles/getArticle.aspx?articleID=65).

In your current implementation of a Stack, you don't specify a constructor. You need to create something along the lines of:

public Stack(int x) {
   // initialize your array (anArray) that represents a stack to size 5
}
share|improve this answer

1) Trying to Pop an item from the empty stack can be treated as an invalid operation, so if only you allow user to check if the stack is empty (and you do this I see), it is perfectly correct to throw new InvalidOperationException("The stack is empty.") there.

2) Constructor issue - there's no constructor in your code. The constructor looks like a method, but it doesn't have a return value and has the same name as your class. It is called by new operator and can take arguments like every method. So you can take that 5 like that:

public Stack(int depth)
{
    // do something with depth
}
share|improve this answer

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