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I have a BitArray with the length of 8, and I need a function to convert it to a byte. How to do it?

Specifically, I need a correct function of ConvertToByte

    BitArray bit=new BitArray(new bool[]
                                  {
                                      false,false,false,false,
                                      false,false,false,true
});
    //How to write ConvertToByte
    byte myByte=ConvertToByte(bit);
    var recoveredBit = new BitArray(new[] { myByte });
    Assert.AreEqual(bit, recoveredBit);
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7 Answers 7

up vote 26 down vote accepted

This should work:

byte ConvertToByte(BitArray bits)
{
    if (bits.Count != 8)
    {
        throw new ArgumentException("bits");
    }
    byte[] bytes = new byte[1];
    bits.CopyTo(bytes, 0);
    return bytes[0];
}
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4  
Mind: this computes the bits in reverse order, e.g. the BitArray from the example will convert into 128, not 1! –  tehvan Feb 18 '09 at 7:41
    
Why does this happen in a reverse order? –  Kornelije Petak Feb 4 '10 at 19:39
    
@kornelijepetak: That's just the way that BitArray works, in terms of the way it chooses to copy values. –  Jon Skeet Feb 4 '10 at 19:43
3  
@kornelijepetak: It is important that it copies in reverse order. If you use BitConverter on other types they are stored in little-endian format. –  user295190 Oct 4 '10 at 18:25
    
Its important to draw the distinction between byte endianness and bit endianness. Bit endianness tells you the ordering of the bits in each byte and whether the first bit is the most or least significant bit. Byte endianness tells you the expected order of the bytes in a word. Bit endianess is usually always described as "LSB first" or "MSB first" rather than little-endian or big-endian... –  Jim Nov 11 at 12:01

A bit late post, but this works for me:

public static byte[] BitArrayToByteArray(BitArray bits)
{
    byte[] ret = new byte[(bits.Length - 1) / 8 + 1];
    bits.CopyTo(ret, 0);
    return ret;
}

Works with:

string text = "Test";
byte[] bytes = System.Text.Encoding.ASCII.GetBytes(text);
BitArray bits = new BitArray(bytes);
bytes[] bytesBack = BitArrayToByteArray(bits);
string textBack = System.Text.Encoding.ASCII.GetString(bytesBack);
// bytes == bytesBack
// text = textBack

.

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6  
Instead of "bits.Length / 8", you should use "(bits.Length - 1) / 8 + 1", otherwise if the BitArray has a length of 7, your byte array will be empty. The "- 1" part makes sure a multiple of 8 will not return plus one. Thanks to stackoverflow.com/questions/17944/… –  iano Nov 2 '11 at 22:03
    
Good point. A Math.Max(1, bits.Length / 8) will also work I guess (slightly more readable). I always operate on 8 bit bytes so I haven't considered the underflow condition. –  Tedd Hansen Nov 15 '11 at 19:17

This should do the trick. However the previous answer is quite likely the better option.

    public byte ConvertToByte(BitArray bits)
    {
        if (bits.Count > 8)
            throw new ArgumentException("ConvertToByte can only work with a BitArray containing a maximum of 8 values");

        byte result = 0;

        for (byte i = 0; i < bits.Count; i++)
        {
            if (bits[i])
                result |= (byte)(1 << i);
        }

        return result;
    }

In the example you posted the resulting byte will be 0x80. In other words the first value in the BitArray coresponds to the first bit in the returned byte.

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A poor man's solution:

protected byte ConvertToByte(BitArray bits)
{
    if (bits.Count != 8)
    {
        throw new ArgumentException("illegal number of bits");
    }

    byte b = 0;
    if (bits.Get(7)) b++;
    if (bits.Get(6)) b += 2;
    if (bits.Get(5)) b += 4;
    if (bits.Get(4)) b += 8;
    if (bits.Get(3)) b += 16;
    if (bits.Get(2)) b += 32;
    if (bits.Get(1)) b += 64;
    if (bits.Get(0)) b += 128;
    return b;
}
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That's should be the ultimate one. Works with any length of array.

private List<byte> BoolList2ByteList(List<bool> values)
    {

        List<byte> ret = new List<byte>();
        int count = 0;
        byte currentByte = 0;

        foreach (bool b in values) 
        {

            if (b) currentByte |= (byte)(1 << count);
            count++;
            if (count == 7) { ret.Add(currentByte); currentByte = 0; count = 0; };              

        }

        if (count < 7) ret.Add(currentByte);

        return ret;

    }
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I believe there's a bug here - since count++; has already fired, the next line should be if (count == 8) {...} –  Stephen Rudolph Aug 15 at 15:13
byte GetByte(BitArray input)
{
  int len = input.Length;
  if (len > 8)
    len = 8;
  int output = 0;
  for (int i = 0; i < len; i++)
    if (input.Get(i))
      output += (1 << (len - 1 - i)); //this part depends on your system (Big/Little)
      //output += (1 << i); //depends on system
  return (byte)output;
}

Cheers!

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Little endian byte array converter : First bit (indexed with "0") in the BitArray assumed to represents least significant bit (rightmost bit in the bit-octet) which interpreted as "zero" or "one" as binary.

 public static class BitArrayExtender {

    public static byte[] ToByteArray( this BitArray bits ) {

        const int BYTE = 8;
        int length = ( bits.Count / BYTE ) + ( (bits.Count % BYTE == 0) ? 0 : 1 );
        var bytes  = new byte[ length ];

        for ( int i = 0; i < bits.Length; i++ ) {

           int bitIndex  = i % BYTE;
           int byteIndex = i / BYTE;

           int mask = (bits[ i ] ? 1 : 0) << bitIndex;
           bytes[ byteIndex ] |= (byte)mask;

        }//for

        return bytes;

    }//ToByteArray

 }//class
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