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I have an MVC 3 REST API that has a simple controller: ApiController. There is a method Foo in ApiController that takes some string information in and returns a JSON result:

public class ApiController : Controller
{
    [HttpPost]
    public JsonResult Foo(string input)
    {
        ...
    }
}

I want to have a JQuery method call Foo with some user-entered data and display the result.

The catch here is that I want to check that the user is allowed access to Foo. What's the best way to go about this in ASP.NET MVC 3? I think the answer is to use SSL and basic authentication, but I have no idea what that would look like. Also, do I have to roll my own password hashing/salting or is there some way to just use Forms Authentication?

Edit: Note that I'm trying to create an API that third-party developers can use. For example, if someone writes a Rapportive-style browser plug-in that scans your Gmail, sends the text to Foo, and displays it in the browser.

Also, I believe just using Forms Authentication will send the username/password information in plain text, right? I'm not sure how to implement SSL to prevent this.

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2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You could use FormsAuthentication and the [Authorize] attribute. So you might have a AccountController with a LogOn action which will be accessible only through HTTPS. This controller will allow clients to authenticate and get an authentication cookie which will be reused for accessing the API:

public class AccountController: Controller
{
    [HttpPost]
    [RequireHttps]
    public ActionResult LogOn(string username, string password)
    {
        // TODO: verify the credentials and emit an authentication cookie if valid
        // return some result (JSON?) to indicate whether the operation succeeded or
        // not
    }
}

then all that's left is to decorate your other controller actions that you want to secure with the [Authorize] attribute:

public class ApiController : Controller
{
    [HttpPost]
    [Authorize]
    public JsonResult Foo(string input)
    {
        ...
    }
}

So now a client will need to first call the LogOn action and fetch the corresponding authentication cookie in the response which will be sent along subsequent calls to your API.

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Thanks Darin, I didn't know about RequireHttps. I still have the question of how do I allow 3rd-party developers to build using my API. I want a stateless API where they basically submit username/pw every time they make a call. For instance, if some rails developer wants to build a web app that calls Foo, it shouldn't be a problem, they just call the URL with the appropriate username/pw for their developer account. Similar to how Facebook uses developer keys I suppose. –  Wesley Tansey Apr 9 '11 at 19:55
1  
@Wesley Tansey, in this case you could write a custom Authorize attribute in which you would verify the validity of some token passed by the client. It could be a custom HTTP header or something else. Could be username/password or you could send clients some private key which will be required for them to send along each request and which you would decrypt in the overriden AuthorizeCore method and verify its validity. –  Darin Dimitrov Apr 9 '11 at 21:31
    
Thanks. That's what I was thinking. Seems like such a common task should be more straight-forward in .NET. Doesn't almost everybody building a web app need a developer API these days? –  Wesley Tansey Apr 9 '11 at 22:58
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You should be able to use the [Authorize] attribute to do what you want here. See the following details and example on MSDN: http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/system.web.mvc.authorizeattribute.aspx

You can authorize specific users, or users within a specific Role.

The default Forms-based authentication provided when you create a new (non-empty) ASP.NET MVC project will enable you to authorize users.

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I'm aware of the Authorize attribute. I don't know if that will work for me though. I want to create a developer API that third-party applications can use, preferably a stateless API. For example, imagine a Rapportive-style browser plug-in that reads your emails in Gmail and processes them with Foo, then displays the result in the browser. –  Wesley Tansey Apr 8 '11 at 23:15
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