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Forgive the poor readability of my examples, but this code is for code-golfing, not for production code.

Consider the following script:

print'+'x$z,($z=1,$w)?'':$_ for 1..3;

This prints, as I would expect, 1+2+3. The variable $z is initially unassigned, so '+'x$z evaluates to empty; after that, $z is set to 1, so '+'x$z now evaluates to +.

However, if I change this so that $z contains the + itself:

print$z,($z='+',$w)?'':$_ for 1..3;

the script now prints +1+2+3. This seems to suggest to me that the order of execution is different, but I don’t understand why.

What are the precise rules regarding order of execution that cause these two examples to behave differently? Is the order of execution even well-defined?

share|improve this question
    
Any reason for not using print join '+', 1..3? I mean it's golf, right? –  Zaid Apr 9 '11 at 16:18
    
@Zaid: Because the code here is just a simplified example. Here is my golf entry that prompted this question. The relevant statement is (now) print$t>0?"$z":'-',($z='+',$w/=$s)-1?"\\frac{$u}{$w}":$u,$p>1?"x^$p":x x$p. –  Timwi Apr 9 '11 at 21:27
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3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Arguments are passed by reference in Perl.

print $z, ($z='+',$w) ? '' : $_;

is basically

{
   local @_;
   alias $_[0] = $z;
   alias $_[1] = ($z='+',$w) ? '' : $_;
   &print;
}

Because $_[0] is aliased to $z, changes to $z are reflected in $_[0], even if those changes occur after the argument is evaluated.

You can see the same effect in the following:

my $x = 3;
sub f { 
   ++$x;
   print("$_[0]\n");
}
f($x);  # 4
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, that explains it. If I change the $z to "$z" it gets evaluated and it works again as expected. Thanks! –  Timwi Apr 9 '11 at 0:19
    
Indeed, @Timwi. "$z" creates a new string from $z, and no changes to $z will affect that copy. –  ikegami Apr 9 '11 at 5:00
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Here's my attempt to make sense of your two examples. Consider this script:

use strict;
use warnings;
use Data::Dumper;

sub dd { print Dumper(\@_) }

my $z = 0;

dd($z + 2, ($z = 1));  # Similar to your Version 1.
dd($z,     ($z = 1));  # Similar to your Version 2.

The output, with some comments:

$VAR1 = [
          2,              # The constant 2.
          1               # $z by reference, which prints as 1.
        ];
$VAR1 = [
          1,              # $z by reference.
          ${\$VAR1->[0]}  # Ditto.
        ];

In Version 1, Perl cannot pass $z + 2 directly to dd(). It must evaluate the expression. The result of that evaluation (the constant 2) is passed as the first argument. The second argument is also evaluated: $z is set to 1, the return value of the assignment is $z, and then $z is passed by reference to dd().

In Version 2, Perl can simply pass the first argument directly by reference: no need to evaluate a larger expression. The second argument is the same as in Version 1. The result is that dd() receives same variable twice, as shown in the Data::Dumper output.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks! (Although it seems that you are just repeating what ikegami said and then demonstrating that it is true...) –  Timwi Apr 10 '11 at 12:15
    
@Timwi Perhaps so, but with less obfuscation, IMHO. –  FMc Apr 10 '11 at 16:01
    
Nit: You talk of references being passed, but that's inaccurate. No reference is involved. "$z is passed by reference to the function" is the correct terminology. This is achieved by aliasing the elements of @_. –  ikegami Apr 11 '11 at 5:18
    
@ikegami I edited the answer. Thanks for the clarification. –  FMc Apr 11 '11 at 11:51
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The Original Answer

You need to run this through perl -MO=Deparse,-p. The first bit of code shows this:

print(('+' x $z), ((($z = 1), $w) ? '' : $_)) foreach (1 .. 3);

But the second bit of code shows this:

print($z, ((($z = '+'), $w) ? '' : $_)) foreach (1 .. 3);

Confusticated and Bebothered

Apparently that proved insufficient to sufficiently explain matters to some people. It was not supposed to be, for I had thought it perfectly clear.

The accepted solution erroneously states that this somehow has something to do with the fact that Perl passes scalar variables by implicit reference. It has nothing to with that at all. It is a simple matter of precedence and order of evaluation. I had intended that the Deparse output should make that clear.

Apparently some are still confused.


The First Version

Very well, here’s your explanation all daintied up on silver platter for you.

This:

print'+'x$z,($z=1,$w)?'':$_ for 1..3;

is equivalent, courtesy of Deparse and some extra formating, to this:

{
    ($w, $z) = (undef, undef);
    for (1..3) {
        print(("+" x $z), ((($z = 1), $w) ? "" : $_))
    }
} continue {
    print "\n";
}

Now, unrolling the loop and separating out what happens when produces this:

{
     ($w, $z) = (undef, undef);
    {
        local $_ = 1;
        $temp = "+" x $z; # $z is undef
        $z = 1;
        print $temp, $_;
    }
    {
        local $_ = 2;
        $temp = "+" x $z; # $z is 1
        $z = 1;
        $_ = $_;
        print $temp, $_;
    }
    {
        local $_ = 3;
        $temp = "+" x $z; # $z is 1
        $z = 1;
        $_ = $_;
        print $temp, $_;
    }
} continue {
    print "\n";
}

All three of those produce identical output: 1+2+3.

The Second Version

Now we start again with the original:

print$z,($z='+',$w)?'':$_ for 1..3;

and produce a deparsing version:

{
    ($w, $z) = (undef, undef);
    for (1..3) {
        print($z, ((($z = "+"), $w) ? "" : $_));
    }
} continue {
    print "\n";
}

followed by a loop unroll version:

{
    ($w, $z) = (undef, undef);
    {
        local $_ = 1;
        $z = "+";
        print $z, $_;
    }
    {
        local $_ = 2;
        $z = "+";
        print $z, $_;
    }
    {
        local $_ = 3;
        $z = "+";
        print $z, $_;
    }
} continue {
    print "\n";
}

All three versions, for reasons I REALLY HOPE ARE NOW ABUNDANTLY CLEAR print the same result: +1+2+3.


For Further Enlightenment

The best way to track down what is happening when is to put a trace on it:

tie $z, "Tie::Trace", "z";
tie $w, "Tie::Trace", "w";

($w, $z) = (undef, undef);
print'+'x$z,($z=1,$w)?'':$_ for 1..3;
print "\n";

{
    ($w, $z) = (undef, undef);
    for (1..3) {
        print(("+" x $z), ((($z = 1), $w) ? "" : $_))
    }
} continue {
    print "\n";
}

{
     ($w, $z) = (undef, undef);
    {
        local $_ = 1;
        $temp = "+" x $z; # $z is undef
        $z = 1;
        print $temp, $_;
    }
    {
        local $_ = 2;
        $temp = "+" x $z; # $z is 1
        $z = 1;
        $_ = $_;
        print $temp, $_;
    }
    {
        local $_ = 3;
        $temp = "+" x $z; # $z is 1
        $z = 1;
        $_ = $_;
        print $temp, $_;
    }
} continue {
    print "\n";
}

($w, $z) = (undef, undef);
print$z,($z='+',$w)?'':$_ for 1..3;
print "\n";

{
    ($w, $z) = (undef, undef);
    for (1..3) {
        print($z, ((($z = "+"), $w) ? "" : $_));
    }
} continue {
    print "\n";
}

{
    ($w, $z) = (undef, undef);
    {
        local $_ = 1;
        $z = "+";
        print $z, $_;
    }
    {
        local $_ = 2;
        $z = "+";
        print $z, $_;
    }
    {
        local $_ = 3;
        $z = "+";
        print $z, $_;
    }
} continue {
    print "\n";
}

package Tie::Trace;

sub TIESCALAR {
    my($class, $name, $value) = @_;
    return bless {
        NAME  => $name,
        VALUE => undef,
    } => $class;
}

sub FETCH {
    my($self) = @_;
    my $name = '$' . $self->{NAME};
    my $value = $self->{VALUE};
    print STDERR "[reading value ", defined($value) ? $value : "undef",
            " from $name]\n";
    return $value;
}

sub STORE {
    my($self, $value) = @_;
    my $name = '$' . $self->{NAME};
    print STDERR "[writing value ", defined($value) ? $value : "undef",
            " into $name]\n";
    $self->{VALUE} = $value;
    return $value;
}

When you run that, it produces this rather gratifying output:

[writing value undef into $w]
[writing value undef into $z]
[reading value undef from $z]
[reading value undef from $z]
[writing value 1 into $z]
[reading value undef from $w]
[reading value 1 from $z]
[reading value 1 from $z]
[writing value 1 into $z]
[reading value undef from $w]
[reading value 1 from $z]
[reading value 1 from $z]
[writing value 1 into $z]
[reading value undef from $w]
1+2+3
[writing value undef into $w]
[writing value undef into $z]
[reading value undef from $z]
[reading value undef from $z]
[writing value 1 into $z]
[reading value undef from $w]
[reading value 1 from $z]
[reading value 1 from $z]
[writing value 1 into $z]
[reading value undef from $w]
[reading value 1 from $z]
[reading value 1 from $z]
[writing value 1 into $z]
[reading value undef from $w]
1+2+3
[writing value undef into $w]
[writing value undef into $z]
[reading value undef from $z]
[reading value undef from $z]
[writing value 1 into $z]
[reading value 1 from $z]
[reading value 1 from $z]
[writing value 1 into $z]
[reading value 1 from $z]
[reading value 1 from $z]
[writing value 1 into $z]
1+2+3
[writing value undef into $w]
[writing value undef into $z]
[writing value + into $z]
[reading value undef from $w]
[reading value + from $z]
[writing value + into $z]
[reading value undef from $w]
[reading value + from $z]
[writing value + into $z]
[reading value undef from $w]
[reading value + from $z]
+1+2+3
[writing value undef into $w]
[writing value undef into $z]
[writing value + into $z]
[reading value undef from $w]
[reading value + from $z]
[writing value + into $z]
[reading value undef from $w]
[reading value + from $z]
[writing value + into $z]
[reading value undef from $w]
[reading value + from $z]
+1+2+3
[writing value undef into $w]
[writing value undef into $z]
[writing value + into $z]
[reading value + from $z]
[writing value + into $z]
[reading value + from $z]
[writing value + into $z]
[reading value + from $z]
+1+2+3

Summary

I have now laboriously demonstrated that what is actually happening here as nothing whatsoever to do with pass-by-reference. It has to do with only the order of evaluation alone, and nothing else.

share|improve this answer
    
Many thanks for the detailed discussion. However, at the risk of demotivating you, I am afraid you have still not enlightened me for the general case. From your answer I would not be able to deduce the order of execution for any other code. In particular, you say that in the first example, '+' x $z is stored in a temp variable, and then $z is modified afterwards; but in the second example somehow there is no temp variable and $z is modified before being passed to print. Why is '+' x $z stored in a temp but $z is not? It seems random. I want to know the rules behind this. –  Timwi Apr 9 '11 at 18:04
    
Furthermore, you claim that the answer I accepted is wrong and there is no pass-by-reference. I tested this using a very simple script: sub xyz { $_[0]++; } $c = 1; xyz($c); print $c; If you are right, this should print 1. However, it prints 2, indicating that there is pass-by-reference. –  Timwi Apr 9 '11 at 18:07
    
@Timwi: I never said Perl doesn’t do pass-by-reference of scalar values; trust me, I am perfectly aware that it is does, and how it does so. I said that pass-by-reference is completely unrelated to what is happening, which is wholly explicable via simple matters of precedence and execution order. With the exception of split, map, and grep, any expressions appearing in slots that would be arguments to a function call are fully evaluated before the function call is itself evaluated. Obviously the $z=1 must be evaluated first because of the sync point of the comma operator. –  tchrist Apr 9 '11 at 18:28
    
@Timwi, ɪɴ sʜᴏʀᴛ: Because the assignment of $z="+" must occur before the call to print, by the time the print finally happens, the value passed in is "+". That’s why print "lost${x}found\n" if $x = "+" will always print out "lost+found": the assignment happened before print was even called. There is no need to resort to pass-by-reference to explain this. –  tchrist Apr 9 '11 at 18:45
    
You still haven’t answered the question: Why is '+' x $z stored in a temp but $z is not? It seems random. I want to know the rules behind this. –  Timwi Apr 9 '11 at 20:50
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